faucaria tuberculosa – tiger jaws

faucaria tuberculosa is commonly known as tiger jaws or sometimes pebbled tiger jaws. the south african native succulent is belonging to the aizoaceae family. its yellow flowers are opened at afternoon and closed during night time.

care

the tiger jaws likes a bright and sunny position throughout the year. but it’s also growing on a light shaded place.

the soil should be well drained with some sand and grit. i’m using a mix of loam free garden soil, sand and pumice (2:1:1). regular cactus mixes can contain too much humus, then some sand and grit should be added.

from spring to fall, the soil can be drenched well. water running out of the pot’s hole should be removed after a few minutes. before adding water next allow to dry. at this time a half diluted cactus fertilizer can be given monthly. repotted plants don’t need to be fed for the first eight weeks.

faucaria tuberculosa can be cultivated at room temperature throughout the year and needs a winter minimum of 15 °c/59 °f. at this temperature range it has to be kept nearly dry and must not be fed.

tiger jaws faucaria tuberculosa

propagation

the tiger jaws (faucaria tuberculosa) can be propagated with seeds, cuttings or by division.

vriesea carinata – lobster claw

vriesea carinata is commonly known as lobster claw or painted feather. this bromeliad has branching flower spikes. there are a lot of varieties available, in a range of colours from yellow to orange, red, violett or pink.

care

the lobster claw (vriesea carinata) is suitable for bright to light shaded places with some morning and/or evening sun.

there are special mixes for bromeliads available. but it can also be grown in a mix of regular potting soil and orchid bark (1:1) or in pure orchid soil.

keep it constantly moist but not wet, the drying of the soil’s surface will be tolerated, but it shouldn’t d dry completely. sitting in water can cause rotten roots. its reservoir should always contain some water.

in spring and summer a half diluted water soluble fertilizer can be given monthly and every six to eight weeks in fall and winter.

vriesea carinata welcomes a high humidity and likes to be sprayed over with water regularly. it needs room temperature throughout the year with a winter minimum of 15 °c/59 °f.

propagation

after flowering the lobster claw produces a new pup. if it has reached approx. 2/3 of the mother plants height it can be cutted of.

brighamia insignis – hawaiian vulcan palm

brighamia insignis belongs to the campanulaceae family and is endemic to hawaii. this means it’s the only place where it is found. it has a succulent stem with leaves forming a dense rosette at the top. it’s an endangered species, commonly known as hawaiian vulcan palm, älula, olulu or sometimes cabbage on a stick.

care

brighamia insignis does best if located from bright with some morning and/or evening sun to light shaded. if placed outside during summer it should be protected from afternoon sun.

the hawaiin vulcan palm needs a well drained soil. i’m using a mix of loam free garden soil, coarse sand and pumice (2:1:1). but it also grows in a regular cactus mix.

it can be deep watered, what’s flowing out of the pot should be removed after a few minutes. wet legs can cause rotten roots. before adding water next let the soil moderately dry.

a half diluted cactus fertilizer can be given monthly in spring and summer and every six to eight weeks during fall and winter. recently repotted plants don’t need to be fed for the first six to eight weeks.

brighamia insignis has to be cultivated at room temperature the year round and needs a winter minimum of 15 °c/59 °f.

a high humidity is welcome and it likes to be sprayed over with water every day. alternatively it can be placed near a humidity tray. this may also protect it from spider mites.

hawaiian alula brighamia insignis

propagation

the hawaiin vulcan palm can be propagated with seeds.

faucaria tigrina – tiger jaws

the genus faucaria belongs to the aizoaceae family and contains nine members, of wich the tiger jaws (faucaria tigrina) is the most popular. the yellow blooming succulents are native to south africa. the flowers are opened at afternoon and closed in the night.

care

the tiger jaws does best if located bright and sunny the year round. a light shaded place will be tolerated.

the soil should be well drained with some sand and grit. i’m using a mix of loam free garden soil, sand and pumice (2:1:1). regular cactus mixes can contain too much humus, then it should be mixed with sand and grit.

from spring to fall, faucaria tigrina can be deep watered. what’s running out of the pot’s hole should be removed after a few minutes. before adding water next allow to dry. at this time a half diluted cactus fertilizer can be given monthly. repotted plants don’t need to be fed for the first eight weeks.

faucaria tigrina can be cultivated at room temperature throughout the year and needs a winter minimum of 15 °c/59 °f. at this temperature range it has to be kept nearly dry, a fertilizer must not be given.

propagation

the tiger jaws can be propagated with seeds, cuttings or by division.

aloe distans – jewelled aloe

the genus aloe belongs to the asphodelaceae family and contains approx. 400 members. the jewelled aloe (aloe distans) is native to south africa.

care

aloe distans does best if located bright and sunny. if placed outside during summer, make sure that rainwater easily can flow out of the pot. wet legs can cause root rot.

the jewelled aloe needs a well drained soil. a regular cactus mix or a mix between standard potting soil and sand (3:2) can be used.

it can be deep watered, water running out of the pot’s hole should be removed after a few minutes. before watering next allow to dry.

in spring and summer a half diluted cactus fertilizer can be given monthly and if placed at room temperature in fall/winter every eight weeks.

during winter the jewelled aloe can be placed at 10-15 °c/50-59 °f. at this temperature range it has to be kept nearly dry und must not be fed. a cold period can have an positive impact for producing its flowers. if placed at room temperature, give as much light as you can.

jewelled aloe distans

propagation

aloe distans can be propagated by division, cuttings or with seeds.

crassula “springtime”

crassula “springtime” is a cultivar, based on c. rupestris. it’s available with green and silver leaves and flowering in pink.

care

crassula “springtime” likes a bright position with some morning- and/or evening sun. a half shaded place will be tolerated. afternoon sun and high heat in summer can cause leaf drop.

the soil should be well drained. a regular cactus mix or a mix between standard potting soil, coarse sand and grit (2:1:1) can be used.

drench the soil well, water flowing out of the pot’s hole should be removed after a few minutes. wet legs can cause root rot. before watering next allow to dry.

in spring and summer a half diluted cactus fertilizer can be given monthly and every six to eight weeks in fall/winter (if placed at room temperature).

crassula “springtime” can be grown at room temperature the year round and needs a winter minimum of 15 °c/59 °f. at this temperature range it has to be kept nearly dry and must not be fed.

crassula springtime

propagation

crassula “springtime” can be propagated with cuttings.

vriesea splendens – flaming sword

vriesea splendens’ common name flaming sword is based on its sword shaped inflorescence with closely overlapping bright red bracts. the popular houseplant is also known as zebra bromeliad or painted feather. its native to south america where its growing epiphytic (sitting on trees).

care

the flaming sword (vriesea splendens) can be placed from bright with some morning and/or evening sun to light shaded.

it can be grown in a mix of regular potting soil and orchid bark (1:1) or in pure orchid soil. there are also special mixes for bromeliads available.

keep it constantly moist but not wet, the drying of the soil’s surface will be tolerated, but it don’t let it dry completely. sitting in water can cause rotten roots. its reservoir should always be filled with some water.

in spring and summer a half diluted water soluble fertilizer can be given monthly and every six to eight weeks in fall and winter.

vriesea splendens welcomes a high humidity and likes to be sprayed over with water regularly. it should be grown at room temperature the year round with a winter minimum of 15 °c/59 °f.

propagation

after flowering the flaming sword produces a new pup. if this has reached approx. 2/3 of the mother plants height it can be cutted of.

peperomia maculosa – spotted peperomia

the spotted peperomia (peperomia maculosa) has dark green shiny leathery leaves. the easy to care houseplant is native to the tropical central and south america.

care

peperomia maculosa is doing best if located bright without afternoon sun. some morning and/or evening sun will be tolerated. but it can also be grown on a light shaded position.

a good regular potting mix can be used. keep it evenly moist but not wet. sitting in water can cause root rot. the drying of the soil’s surface will be tolerated.

a water soluble fertilizer at half strength can be given monthly in spring/summer and if placed at room temperature in fall/winter every six to eight weeks.

the spotted peperomia likes room temperature the year round, with a winter minimum of approx. 15 °c/59 °f. at this temperature range, watering can be reduced and there is no need to feed.

to keep its leaves free from dust it can be sprayed over with water from time to time.

peperomia maculosa spotted peperomia

propagation

the spotted peperomia (peperomia maculosa) can be propagated with cuttings.

homalocladium platycladum – tapeworm plant, ribbon bush

the tapeworm plant (homalocladium platycladum) is native to the solomon islands. its common name is based on the flat leafless stems that resemble tapeworms. it’s also known as ribbon bush or centipede plant.

care

the tapeworm plant does best if located bright with some morning and/or evening sun. but it also can be grown on a light shaded place.

it can be planted in a standard potting mix. keep it evenly moist and because of rotten roots avoid overwatering. the drying of the soil’s surface will be tolerated, but it should not completely dry, this can cause leaf drop.

during spring and summer a water soluble fertilizer diluted at half can be given monthly and if placed at room temperatur in fall/winter every six to eight weeks. newly purchased or recently re-potted plants don’t need to be fed for the first six to eight weeks.

homalocladium platycladum can be cultivated at room temperature the year round with a winter minimum of 10 °c/59 °f. at this temperature range it needs less watering (but shouldn’t completely dry) and no fertilizing.

it likes a medium humidity and welcomes if sprayed over with water regularly.

propagation

the tapeworm plant (homalocladium platycladum) can be propagated with seeds or cuttings.

anthurium andraeanum – flamingo flower

the genus anthurium belongs to the araceae family and contains more than 800 members. most of them are native to the rain forests of central to south america. anthurium andraeanum is commonly known as flamingo flower. there are cultivars with a white or pink spadix available.

care

the flamingo flower does best if located in bright light without direct sun. but it also can be placed from light shaded to shaded.

it can be grown in a good regular potting mix. this has to be kept evenly moist but not wet, sitting in water can cause rotten roots. a slightly drying of the soil’s surface between watering will be tolerated, but it shouldn’t dry completely.

anthurium andraeanum welcomes a high humidity. it can be increased by spraying it over with water every day or placing the pot on a large plant saucer, filled with water. to assure that the pot do not contact the water put it in a smaller plant saucer.

it can be fed with a water soluble fertilizer at half strength. monthly in spring and summer and every six to eight weeks in fall and winter.

the flamingo flower likes it warm throughout the year with a winter minimum of 15 °c/59 °f.

propagation

the flamingo flower can be propagated with cuttings or by division.