aloe juvenna

the genus aloe belongs to the asphodelaceae family and contains approx. 400 members. aloe juvenna is native to kenya.

care

aloe juvenna can be placed from sunny to light shaded. in hot summer sun its leaves can turn to red/brown. if placed outside during summer make sure that rainwater can easily flow out of the pot, because wet legs can cause rotten roots.

a regular cactus mix or a mix between standard potting soil and sand (3:2) can be used.

drench it well, water running out of the pot’s hole should be removed after a few minutes. before adding water next allow to dry.

in spring and summer a cactus fertilizer at half strength can be given monthly and if placed at room temperature in fall/winter every eight weeks.

aloe juvenna can be grown at room temperature the year round with a winter minimum of 10-15 °c/50-59 °f. at this temperature range it has to be kept nearly dry und must not be fed. for flowering it needs a cold period.

aloe juvenna

propagation

aloe juvenna can be propagated by division, cuttings or with seeds.

crassula “morgan’s beauty”

crassula “morgan’s beauty” is a crossing between c. perfoliata var. minor and c. mesembryanthemopsis, both native to the southern africa.

care

crassula “morgan’s beauty” does best in bright light with some morning- and/or evening sun. a half shaded place will be tolerated. afternoon sun and high heat in summer can cause leaf drop.

it likes a very porous soil, a standard cactus mix or a mix between regular potting soil, coarse sand and grit (2:1:1) can be used.

drench the soil well, water running out of the pot’s hole must be removed after a few minutes. wet legs can cause rotten roots. before adding water next allow to dry.

in spring and summer a cactus fertilizer at half strength can be given monthly and every six to eight weeks in fall/winter (if placed at room temperature).

crassula “morgan’s beauty” can be grown at room temperature throughout the year with a winter minimum of 15 °c/59 °f. at this temperature range it needs less watering and no feeding.

crassula morgans beauty

propagation

crassula “morgan’s beauty” can easily be propagated with cuttings.

crassula “baby necklace”

crassula “baby necklace” is a crossing between c. rupestris and c. perforata.

care

crassula “baby necklace” does best on a bright location with some morning and/or evening sun. afternoon sun and high heat in summer can cause leaf drop. light shade will be tolerated.

the soil should be very porous, a standard cactus mix or a mix between regular potting soil, coarse sand and grit (2:1:1) can be used.

it can be deep watered, what’s running out of the pot’s hole should be removed after a few minutes. sitting in water can cause rotten roots. allow to dry before watering next.

a half diluted cactus fertilizer can be given monthly in spring and summer and every eight weeks in fall and winter.

crassula “baby necklace” can be placed at room temperature the year round with a winter minimum of 15 °c/59 °f. at this temperature range it needs less watering and no feeding.

crassula baby necklace

propagation

crassula “baby necklace” can be propagated with cuttings.

codiaeum variegatum – croton

the croton (codiaeum variegatum) is the most common member of the genus, belonging to the euphorbiaceae family. there are a lot of cultivars availalbe, in nearly every color you want, with broad, small or twisted leaves. its leathery foliage is starting out green and developing more colorful as it matures.

care

for developing its colorful foliage the croton needs a bright and sunny location without afternoon sun. light shaded or shaded placed plants tend to develop more green leaves.

a good regular potting mix can be used. keep it evenly moist but not wet, sitting in water can cause rotten roots. a slightly drying of the soil’s surface between watering will be tolerated, but it shouldn’t dry completely.

a water soluble fertilizer at half strenght can be given monthly in spring and summer and every six to eight weeks in fall and winter (if placed at approx. 20 °c/68 °f).

codiaeum variegatum can be grown at room temperature the year round with a winter minimum of 16 °c/60 °f. if placed at this temperature range it needs less watering (but shouldn’t dry out at all) and no feeding.

a high humidity is welcome. it can be increased by spraying it over with water every morning or placing the pot on a large plant saucer, filled with water. to assure that the pot do not contact the water put it in a smaller plant saucer.

propagation

the croton can be propagated with cuttings.

peperomia “bibi” – radiator plant

some members of the genus peperomia are commonly known as radiator plant. peperomia “bibi” is a cultivar, likely to be related with peperomia glabella. it’s suitable for a hanging basekt.

care

peperomia “bibi” can be placed from bright (with a bit morning and/or evening sun) to light shaded. but it’s doing best on a bright location.

a good regular potting mix can be used. keep it evenly moist but not wet. sitting in water can cause rotten roots. the drying of the soil’s surface will be tolerated.

a water soluble fertilizer at half strength can be given monthly in spring/summer and if placed at room temperature in fall/winter every six to eight weeks.

this radiator plant likes room temperature throughout the year, with a winter minimum of approx. 15 °c/59 °f. at this temperature range, watering can be reduced and there is no need to feed.

propagation

the radiator plant can be propagated with cuttings.

gasterhaworthia “fandango”

plants belonging to the genus gasterhaworthia (or gasterworthia, gasworthia) are crossings between gasteria and haworthia. gasterhaworthia “fandango” is based on g. bicolor var. liliputana and haworthia granulata. sounds complicated but they are easy to grow.

care

gasterhaworthia “fandango” is doing best if located bright with partial sun (morning and/or evening). a light shaded place will be tolerated. during summer it can given outside, but then make sure that rainwater can flow out of the pot. give it back if temperature is falling below 10 °c/50 °f constantly because it’s not frost tolerant.

it can be grown in a regular cactus mix, or a mix of regular potting soil, coarse sand and pumice (2:1:1). in spring and summer it can be deep waterd, what’s running out of the pot should be removed after a few minutes. wet legs can cause root rott. before adding water next allow to dry.

a half diluted cactus fertilizer can be given monthly in spring/summer and every six to eight weeks in fall/winter.

gasterhaworthia “fandango” can be grown at room temperature the year round or wintered at 10-15 °c/50-59 °f. now it needs to be less watered and must not be fed.

gasterhaworthia fandango

progation

propagation can be done with leaf cuttings or offsets.

musa acuminata x zebrina – banana

musa acuminata x zebrina is a dwarf cultivar, based on the bananito (m. acuminata, australia) and the blood banana (m. zebrina, indonesia). the leaves are green with red spotches on the topside.

care

this banana is doing best on a sunny location the year round. a light shaded place will be tolerated, but then it’s growing slower and producing smaller leaves. during summer it can be placed outside untill the temperature is falling below 10 °c/50 °f constantly.

it can be planted in a good regular potting mix. keep it evenly moist but not wet, sitting in water can cause root rott. the drying of the soils surface is ok but it shouldn’t dry in complete.

during summer a half diluted water soluble fertilizer can be given every two to four and if placed at room temperature in fall and winter every four to six weeks.

the banana can be grown at room temperature the year round, but can also be located at +/-10 °c/50 °f during winter. if placed at this temperature range, it needs less watering and must not be fed.

musa likes to be sprayed over with water from time to time. this keeps its leaves free from dust.

musa acuminata x  zebrina banana

progation

pragation can be done by division or with seeds.

peperomia obtusifolia – baby rubber plant

the baby rubber plant (peperomia obtusifolia) is the most common of the more than 1,000 species, belonging to the genus. it’s native to venezuela and there are numerous cultivars, with creamy white to yellow variegated leaves available.

care

the green form of peperomia obtusifolia can be located from partial sun (morning/evening) to light shade. for producing their variegation, the colored cultivars shouldn’t be placed too dark.

it can be grown in a good regular potting mix. which has to be kept evenly moist but not wet. wet legs can cause rotten roots. a short drying period will be tolerated.

in spring and summer the baby rubber plant can be fed monthly with a water soluble fertilizer at half strength. during fall and winter every six to eight weeks, if placed at room temperature.

it likes room temperature throughout the year, with a winter minimum of approx. 15 °c/59 °f. at this temperature range, it needs less water and and must not be fed.

peperomia obtusifolia - baby rubber plant
peperomia obtusifolia “usa”

propagation

the baby rubber plant can be propagated with cuttings or seeds.

peperomia caperata – emerald ripple peperomia

the genus peperomia contains more than 1,000 members and some of them are popular houseplants because they do not demand a huge amount of care. the emerald ripple peperomia (peperomia caperata) is native to central america. it has dark green, heart shaped leaves. but there are cultivars available with red or pink, green and white splashes on their leaves.

care

the green emarald ripple peperomia can be located from bright (with some morning and/or evening sun) to light shaded. the colored cultivars are doing best on a bright position. if placed too dark, they can loose their color.

a good regular potting mix can be used. keep it evenly moist but not wet. sitting in water can cause rotten roots. the drying of the soil’s surface will be tolerated.

peperomia caperata can be fed monthly (spring/summer) with a half dulited water soluble fertilizer. if placed at room temperature in fall/winter it can be given every six to eight weeks.

it likes room temperature the year round, with a winter minimum of approx. 15 °c/59 °f. at this temperature range, watering can be reduced and there is no need to feed.

peperomia caperata - emerald ripple peperomia
p. caperata “schumi red”

propagation

peperomia caperata can be propagated with cuttings or seeds.

begonia albo-picta – bambusiforme begonia

the bambusiforme begonia (begonia albo-picta) is native to brazil and available with white, orange or pink flowers. the leaves are white spotted. it can be used as a houseplant or annual and is suitable for a hanging basket.

care

begonia albo-picta does best on a bright location with partial sun (morning/evening). a light shaded place will be tolerated. in summer it can be placed outside, but give it back when temperature is falling below 14 °c/57 °f constantly.

a good regular potting mix can be used. this should be kept moist but not wet. drying at the soil’s surface is ok, but it shouldn’t dry out. overwatering can cause rotten roots.

in spring and summer a half strength water soluble fertilizer can be given monthly, and if placed at room temperature in fall and winter every six to eight weeks.

begonia albo-picta likes room temperatur the year round with a minium of 14 °c/57 °f. if placed at this temperature range in winter, it needs less watering and no fertilizer.

spraying it over with water from time to time keeps its leaves free from dust.

propagation

begonia albo-picta can be propageted by seeds, leaf or stem cuttings.