adromischus alstonii – bulbees

adromischus alstonii is native to south africa. the beautiful succulent is sometimes called bulbees.

plant care

adromischus alstonii does best if located bright and sunny the year round. if placed outside during summer and to avoid rotten roots, make sure that rain water can flow out of the pot’s hole.

the soil should be well drained, im using a mix of some gritty, sand and a bit humus. a regular cactus mix can also be used.

from spring to fall adromischus alstonii can be deep watered. what’s running out of the pot should be removed after a few minutes. before adding water next let the soil dry.

a half diluted cactus fertilizer can be given monthly from spring to fall. fresh bought or recently repotted plants don’t need to be fed for the first six to eight weeks.

if you can give em enough light, adromischus alstonii can be cultivated at room temperature throughout the year. if not, it should be placed at approx. 5-10 (41-59 °f). watering has now to be reduced, a fertilizer must not be given.

adromischus alstonii

propagation

adromischus alstonii can be propagated with seeds or (leaf) cuttings.

adromischus bolusii

adromischus bolusii is a south african native. a common name for this blue-green leaved succulent belonging to the crassulaceae family i havn’t found.

adromischus bolusii care

adromischus bolusii does best on a bright and sunny location the year round. if placed outside during summer, make sure that rain water can easily flow out of the pot’s hole.

the soil should be well drained, im using a mix of some gritty, sand and a bit humus. a regular cactus mix is also welcome.

from spring to fall adromischus bolusii can be deep watered. what’s running out of the pot should be removed after a few minutes. before adding water next let the soil dry. sitting in water can cause rotten roots.

a half diluted cactus fertilizer can be given monthly from spring to fall. fresh bought or recently repotted plants don’t need to be fed for the first six to eight weeks.

if you can give em enough light, adromischus bolusii can be cultivated at room temperature throughout the year. if not, it should be placed at approx. 5-10 (41-59 °f). it now has to be less watered, a fertilizer must not be given.

adromischus bolusii

propagation

propagation can be done with seeds or cuttings.

adromischus cooperi – plover eggs

the sometimes called plover eggs, adromischus cooperi is a south african native. the leaves of this dwarf succulent can get 2.5 to 5 cm (1 to 2 inches) long. it belongs to the crassulaceae family.

plant care

adromischus cooperi likes a bright and sunny place, light shade will be tolerated. during summer it can be placed in the garden, but make sure that rain water can run out of the pot’s hole. because “wet legs” can cause root rot.

the soil should be well drained with some gritty, sand and a bit humus. a regular cactus mix can be used.

the plover eggs need to be good watered, what runs out of the pot should be removed after a few minutes. before watering next the soil must dry.

adromischus cooperi can be fed monthly with a half concentrated cactus fertilizer.

if you can give em enough light, it can be cultivated at room temperature throughout the year. during winter the plover eggs can be placed at 10-15 °c (50-59 °f). then keep it nearly dry and don’t feed.

propagation

adromischus cooperi can be propagated by seeds or cuttings.

aloe distans – jewelled aloe

the genus aloe belongs to the asphodelaceae family and contains approx. 400 members. the jewelled aloe (aloe distans) is native to south africa.

care

aloe distans does best if located bright and sunny. if placed outside during summer, make sure that rainwater easily can flow out of the pot. wet legs can cause root rot.

the jewelled aloe needs a well drained soil. a regular cactus mix or a mix between standard potting soil and sand (3:2) can be used.

it can be deep watered, water running out of the pot’s hole should be removed after a few minutes. before watering next allow to dry.

in spring and summer a half diluted cactus fertilizer can be given monthly and if placed at room temperature in fall/winter every eight weeks.

during winter the jewelled aloe can be placed at 10-15 °c/50-59 °f. at this temperature range it has to be kept nearly dry und must not be fed. a cold period can have an positive impact for producing its flowers. if placed at room temperature, give as much light as you can.

jewelled aloe distans

propagation

aloe distans can be propagated by division, cuttings or with seeds.

aloe juvenna

the genus aloe belongs to the asphodelaceae family and contains approx. 400 members. aloe juvenna is native to kenya.

care

aloe juvenna can be placed from sunny to light shaded. in hot summer sun its leaves can turn to red/brown. if placed outside during summer make sure that rainwater can easily flow out of the pot, because wet legs can cause rotten roots.

a regular cactus mix or a mix between standard potting soil and sand (3:2) can be used.

drench it well, water running out of the pot’s hole should be removed after a few minutes. before adding water next allow to dry.

in spring and summer a cactus fertilizer at half strength can be given monthly and if placed at room temperature in fall/winter every eight weeks.

aloe juvenna can be grown at room temperature the year round with a winter minimum of 10-15 °c/50-59 °f. at this temperature range it has to be kept nearly dry und must not be fed. for flowering it needs a cold period.

aloe juvenna

propagation

aloe juvenna can be propagated by division, cuttings or with seeds.

brighamia insignis – hawaiian vulcan palm

brighamia insignis belongs to the campanulaceae family and is endemic to hawaii. this means it’s the only place where it is found. it has a succulent stem with leaves forming a dense rosette at the top. it’s an endangered species, commonly known as hawaiian vulcan palm, älula, olulu or sometimes cabbage on a stick.

care

brighamia insignis does best if located from bright with some morning and/or evening sun to light shaded. if placed outside during summer it should be protected from afternoon sun.

the hawaiin vulcan palm needs a well drained soil. i’m using a mix of loam free garden soil, coarse sand and pumice (2:1:1). but it also grows in a regular cactus mix.

it can be deep watered, what’s flowing out of the pot should be removed after a few minutes. wet legs can cause rotten roots. before adding water next let the soil moderately dry.

a half diluted cactus fertilizer can be given monthly in spring and summer and every six to eight weeks during fall and winter. recently repotted plants don’t need to be fed for the first six to eight weeks.

brighamia insignis has to be cultivated at room temperature the year round and needs a winter minimum of 15 °c/59 °f.

a high humidity is welcome and it likes to be sprayed over with water every day. alternatively it can be placed near a humidity tray. this may also protect it from spider mites.

hawaiian alula brighamia insignis

propagation

the hawaiin vulcan palm can be propagated with seeds.

cotyledon papillaris

the genus cotyledon belongs to the crassulaceae family and includes about 10 species that are primarily distributed in south africa.

plant care for cotyledon papillaris

cotyledon papillaris does good on a bright or light shaded place with partial sun (morning and/or evening).

it can be planted in regular cactus soil or a mix between humus, sand and gritty (2:1:1). drench the soil and remove water flowing out of the pot after a few minutes. wet legs can cause rotten roots. allow to dry before watering next.

a half diluted cactus fertilizer can be given monthly in spring/summer. when placed at room temperature every eight weeks in fall/winter. cotyledon papillaris can be placed on about 10-15 °c/50-59 °f at this time. then it needs less watering, a fertilizer must not be given.

cotyledon papillaris

propagation

cotyledon papillaris can be propagated by seeds, stem or leaf cuttings. before potting the cut end should dry out for 2-4 days on a bright but not sunny location.

crassula “baby necklace”

crassula “baby necklace” is a crossing between c. rupestris and c. perforata.

care

crassula “baby necklace” does best on a bright location with some morning and/or evening sun. afternoon sun and high heat in summer can cause leaf drop. light shade will be tolerated.

the soil should be very porous, a standard cactus mix or a mix between regular potting soil, coarse sand and grit (2:1:1) can be used.

it can be deep watered, what’s running out of the pot’s hole should be removed after a few minutes. sitting in water can cause rotten roots. allow to dry before watering next.

a half diluted cactus fertilizer can be given monthly in spring and summer and every eight weeks in fall and winter.

crassula “baby necklace” can be placed at room temperature the year round with a winter minimum of 15 °c/59 °f. at this temperature range it needs less watering and no feeding.

crassula baby necklace

propagation

crassula “baby necklace” can be propagated with cuttings.

crassula “morgan’s beauty”

crassula “morgan’s beauty” is a crossing between c. perfoliata var. minor and c. mesembryanthemopsis, both native to the southern africa.

care

crassula “morgan’s beauty” does best in bright light with some morning- and/or evening sun. a half shaded place will be tolerated. afternoon sun and high heat in summer can cause leaf drop.

it likes a very porous soil, a standard cactus mix or a mix between regular potting soil, coarse sand and grit (2:1:1) can be used.

drench the soil well, water running out of the pot’s hole must be removed after a few minutes. wet legs can cause rotten roots. before adding water next allow to dry.

in spring and summer a cactus fertilizer at half strength can be given monthly and every six to eight weeks in fall/winter (if placed at room temperature).

crassula “morgan’s beauty” can be grown at room temperature throughout the year with a winter minimum of 15 °c/59 °f. at this temperature range it needs less watering and no feeding.

crassula morgans beauty

propagation

crassula “morgan’s beauty” can easily be propagated with cuttings.

crassula “springtime”

crassula “springtime” is a cultivar, based on c. rupestris. it’s available with green and silver leaves and flowering in pink.

care

crassula “springtime” likes a bright position with some morning- and/or evening sun. a half shaded place will be tolerated. afternoon sun and high heat in summer can cause leaf drop.

the soil should be well drained. a regular cactus mix or a mix between standard potting soil, coarse sand and grit (2:1:1) can be used.

drench the soil well, water flowing out of the pot’s hole should be removed after a few minutes. wet legs can cause root rot. before watering next allow to dry.

in spring and summer a half diluted cactus fertilizer can be given monthly and every six to eight weeks in fall/winter (if placed at room temperature).

crassula “springtime” can be grown at room temperature the year round and needs a winter minimum of 15 °c/59 °f. at this temperature range it has to be kept nearly dry and must not be fed.

crassula springtime

propagation

crassula “springtime” can be propagated with cuttings.

crassula ausensis

crassula ausensis belongs to the crassulaceae family and is native to namibia. there are different forms of this plant available. in good sunlight the knobby leaves of subspecies titanopsis form red tips.

crassula ausensis

crassula ausensis care

crassula ausensis does best if located bright and sunny the year round. a light shaded place will be tolerated. during summer it can be grown in the garden. but make sure that rainwater can easily flow out of the pot.

this succulent likes a well drained soil. a regular cactus mix can be used. i’m using a mixture of potting soil, coarse sand and pumice (2:1:1).

from spring to fall crassula ausensis can be deep watered. what’s flowing into the saucer must be removed after a few minutes. wet legs can cause rotten roots. before adding water next allow to dry.

a half diluted cactus fertilizer can be given monthly in spring/summer and if placed at room temperature every six to eight weeks in fall/winter. new bought or recently repotted plants don’t need to be fed for the first six to eight weeks.

for showing its inflorescence in spring, a cold winter location may be helpful. crassula ausensis can be placed at 5-10 °c (41-50 °f). at this temperature range it has to be kept nearly dry and don’t need to be fed. if placed at room temperature during winter, give as much light as you can.

crassula ausensis leaves

propagation

crassula ausensis can be grown from seeds or cuttings.

crassula falcata – propeller plant

the propeller plant (crassula falcata) is an easy to care for succulent, native to south africa. it’s flowering from orange to red.

care

crassula falcata likes a sunny place but also does good on a bright or light shaded location. during summer it can be placed in the garden but make sure that rainwater can easily run out of the pot’s hole. if the temperature is falling under 10 °c (50 °f) constantly give it back into the house.

it can be planted in a mix between humus and sand (2:1) or in standart cactus soil. it needs to be good watered, what runs out of the pot’s hole should be removed after a few minutes. allow to dry before adding water next. overwatering can cause rotten roots.

it can be fed with a half diluted cactus fertilizer monthly in spring/summer.

for flowering in spring the propeller plant should be placed at 10-15 °c (50-59 °f). it now has to be kept nearly dry, a fertilizer must not be given.

crassula falcata propeller plant

propagation

the propeller plant (crassula falcata) can be propagated by seeds, stem or leaf cuttings.

crassula cv. “morgan’s beauty”

crassula morgans beauty

crassula “morgan’s beauty is a hybrid between c. falcata and c. mesembryanthemopsis.

crassula muscosa (syn. lycopodioides) – rattail crassula

crassula muscosa (syn. lycopodioides) is native to south africa and namibia. the branching succulent is commonly known as rattail crassula or watch chain. it’s available with green or variegated leaves.

care

crassula muscosa does best if located bright with some morning and/or evening sun. a light shaded place will be tolerated. during summer it can be grown in the garden. but make sure that rainwater can easily flow out of the pot.

the soil must be well drained, a regular cactus mix can be used. i’m using a mixture of potting soil, coarse sand and pumice (2:1:1).

crassula muscosa can be deep watered. what’s flowing into the saucer must be removed after a few minutes. wet legs can cause rotten roots. before adding water next allow to dry.

a half diluted cactus fertilizer can be given monthly in spring/summer and every six to eight weeks in fall/winter (if placed at room temperature).

crassula muscosa can be wintered warm or cool, between 10-15 °c (50-59 °f). at this temperature range it has to be kept nearly dry and must not be fed. a cool winter location can be helpful for blooming in spring.

propagation

crassula muscosa can be propageted with seeds or cuttings.

crassula ovata – jade plant, money tree

the genus crassula belongs to the crassulaceae family and some of their members are popular houseplants. the jade plant (crassula ovata) is native to south africa. it has a lot of common names, like money or friendship tree. there are some cultivars available with yellow to green variegated leaves.

cultivation

the jade plant does good on a bright place with morning and/or evening sun. if placed too dark it can produce small leaves sitting on long and thin stems.

it needs a good drained soil with some sand and/or gritty like it can be found in a regular cactus mix.

crassula ovate need to be good watered, what runs out of the pot should be removed after a few minutes. before watering next let the soil dry. wet legs can cause root rot.

during spring/summer a half concentrated cactus fertilizer can be given monthly. if placed at room temperature in fall/winter it can be fed every eight weeks.

if you can give em enough light, it can be cultivated at room temperature throughout the year. during winter the jade plant can be placed at 10-15 °c (50-59 °f). then keep it nearly dry and don’t feed.

jade plant crassula ovata

propagation

propagation can be done with seeds, stem or leaf cuttings.

echeveria “pearl of nuremberg”

echeveria “pearl of nuremberg” (“perle von nürnberg”) is a hybrid (crossing), based on e. gibbiflora var. metallica and e. potosina. both of them are native to mexico.

care

for showing its rosy-bluish coloured leaves echeveria “pearl of nuremberg” needs a sunny location the year round. if placed in the garden or on the balcony during summer, make sure that rainwater easily can flow out of the pot, because sitting in water can cause rotten roots.

the soil should be well drained, a standart cactus mix can be used. if you want to mix your own you can use regular potting soil, coarse sand and grit (2:1:1).

from spring to fall echeveria “pearl of nuremberg” can be deep watered. what’s running out of the pot must be removed after a few minutes. before watering next the soil should be allowed to dry.

a cactus or regular water soluble fertilizer at half strength can be given monthly in spring and summer. fresh bought or recently repotted plant don’t need to be fed for the first six to eight weeks.

during winter the echeveria can be located at 5-15 °c/41-49 °f. it now has to be kept nearly dry. the colder it’s placed the less watering is needed. a fertilzer must not be given. a cold winter location can be helpful for producing its inflorescense in spring.

echeveria-gibbiflora

propagation

propagation can be done with seeds or offsets.

echeveria derenbergii – baby echeveria, painted lady

the genus echeveria belongs to the crassulaceae family and some of its members are known as “hen and chicks”. echeveria derenbergii is native to mexico. it’s a drought and frost (approx. -4 °c/39 °f) tolerant succulent.

care

the baby echeveria or painted lady likes a sunny to bright location. if placed in the garden or on the balcony, make sure that rainwater can flow out of the pot, because sitting in water can cause rotten roots.

it likes a well drained soil, a standart cactus mix can be used. if you want to mix your own you can use regular potting soil, coarse sand and grit (2:1:1). echeveria derenbergii can be deep waterd, what runs out of the pot should be removed after a few minutes. before adding water next allow to dry.

a half strength cactus or regular water soluble fertilizer can be given monthly in spring and summer. if placed at room temperature in fall and winter every six to eight weeks.

the baby echeveria can be wintered at 5-15 °c/41-49 °f. the colder it’s placed the less watering is needed. a fertilzer must not be given. if placed warmer give as much light as you can.

propagation

echeveria derenbergii can be propagated with seeds or offsets.

euphorbia horrida – african milk barrel

euphorbia horrida is native to south africa and commonly known as african milk barrel. it’s a somewhat variable plant with many varieties and forms. there are also cultivars with red spines and flowers available.

euphorbia horrida

euphorbia horrida – african milk barrel care

this description is based on my experiences with euphorbia horrida var. striata. the cultivation of other forms or varieties can be different.

the african milk barrel does best, if grown on a bright and sunny place throughout the year. a light shaded location will be tolerated. during summer it can be placed in the garden. but make sure that rainwater can easily flow out of the pot. because sitting in water will cause rot.

it grows well in a good drained mineral potting substrate. i’m using a mix of potting soil, seramis (lay granulate), pumice and coarse sand (1:1:1:1).

from spring to fall euphorbia horrida var. striata can be deep watered. what’s flowing out of the pot’s hole must be removed after a few minutes. before adding water next allow to dry.

in spring and summer a half diluted cactus fertilizer can be given monthly. during fall/winter there is no need to feed.

euphorbia horrida var. striata can be cultivated at room temperature the year round and needs a winter minimum of 10 °C/50 °f. the colder it is placed during this season, the less water is needed.

euphorbia horrida flowers

euphorbia horrida propagation

euphorbia horrida can be grown from seeds or cuttings.

euphorbia obesa – baseball plant, basketball plant

on first sight, euphorbia obesa is looking like a cactus without thorns. but it’s a member of the euphorbiaceae family and related to such popular houseplants like the christmas star (e. pulcherrima). the commonly named baseball plant or basketball plant succulent is native to south africa.

care

euphorbia obesa does best in sunny to bright positions. light shade will be tolerated but then it can grow a bit slower. plants growing in moderate shade should be slowly hardened off before placing it in full sun.

it can be planted in a regular cactus mix or a mix between standard potting soil, coarse sand and pumice (2:1:1).

the baseball plant can be deep watered, what’s flowing out of the pot should be removed after a few minutes. wet legs can cause root rott. before watering next allow to dry.

a half strength cactus fertilizer can be given monthly and if placed at room temperature in fall and winter every six to eight weeks.

euphorbia obesa can be grown at room temperature thoughout the year. but it can be placed at approx. 10 °c/50 °f in winter. at this temperature range it should be kept nearly dry, a fertilizer must not be given.

euphorbia obesa baseball plant

propagation

propagation of the baseball plant can be done by seeds.

faucaria tigrina – tiger jaws

the genus faucaria belongs to the aizoaceae family and contains nine members, of wich the tiger jaws (faucaria tigrina) is the most popular. the yellow blooming succulents are native to south africa. the flowers are opened at afternoon and closed in the night.

care

the tiger jaws does best if located bright and sunny the year round. a light shaded place will be tolerated.

the soil should be well drained with some sand and grit. i’m using a mix of loam free garden soil, sand and pumice (2:1:1). regular cactus mixes can contain too much humus, then it should be mixed with sand and grit.

from spring to fall, faucaria tigrina can be deep watered. what’s running out of the pot’s hole should be removed after a few minutes. before adding water next allow to dry. at this time a half diluted cactus fertilizer can be given monthly. repotted plants don’t need to be fed for the first eight weeks.

faucaria tigrina can be cultivated at room temperature throughout the year and needs a winter minimum of 15 °c/59 °f. at this temperature range it has to be kept nearly dry, a fertilizer must not be given.

propagation

the tiger jaws can be propagated with seeds, cuttings or by division.

faucaria tuberculosa – tiger jaws

faucaria tuberculosa is commonly known as tiger jaws or sometimes pebbled tiger jaws. the south african native succulent is belonging to the aizoaceae family. its yellow flowers are opened at afternoon and closed during night time.

care

the tiger jaws likes a bright and sunny position throughout the year. but it’s also growing on a light shaded place.

the soil should be well drained with some sand and grit. i’m using a mix of loam free garden soil, sand and pumice (2:1:1). regular cactus mixes can contain too much humus, then some sand and grit should be added.

from spring to fall, the soil can be drenched well. water running out of the pot’s hole should be removed after a few minutes. before adding water next allow to dry. at this time a half diluted cactus fertilizer can be given monthly. repotted plants don’t need to be fed for the first eight weeks.

faucaria tuberculosa can be cultivated at room temperature throughout the year and needs a winter minimum of 15 °c/59 °f. at this temperature range it has to be kept nearly dry and must not be fed.

tiger jaws faucaria tuberculosa

propagation

the tiger jaws (faucaria tuberculosa) can be propagated with seeds, cuttings or by division.

frithia – baby toes, window plant

the genus frithia belongs to the aizoaceae family and contains two species. both, frithia humilis and frithia pulchra are native to south africa. the beautiful succulents can be recognized trough its blooms and are sometimes called baby toes or window plant.

growing frithia

frithia does best on a sunny place throughout the year. they are opening their blooms in the afternoon sun.

they need a well drained and gritty soil with only a small part of organic material. don’t put them in to a regular potting mix. i’m using a mix of pumice and a little bit of loam free garden soil.

in their natural habitat they have some summer rain and so they are not shy of water. they need to be good watered when they’re blooming, what runs out of the pot’s hole should be removed after a few minutes. between the waterings allow to dry. during winter they should kept nearly dry.

a half concentrated cactus fertilizer can be given monthly during blooming time.

frithia can be cultivated at room temperature the whole year through, with a winter minimum of 14 °c (57 °f).


1-3: f. humilis, 4-6: f. pulchra

propagation

frithia can be propagated by seeds.

frithia humilis

frithia pulchra

gasterhaworthia “fandango”

plants belonging to the genus gasterhaworthia (or gasterworthia, gasworthia) are crossings between gasteria and haworthia. gasterhaworthia “fandango” is based on g. bicolor var. liliputana and haworthia granulata. sounds complicated but they are easy to grow.

care

gasterhaworthia “fandango” is doing best if located bright with partial sun (morning and/or evening). a light shaded place will be tolerated. during summer it can given outside, but then make sure that rainwater can flow out of the pot. give it back if temperature is falling below 10 °c/50 °f constantly because it’s not frost tolerant.

it can be grown in a regular cactus mix, or a mix of regular potting soil, coarse sand and pumice (2:1:1). in spring and summer it can be deep waterd, what’s running out of the pot should be removed after a few minutes. wet legs can cause root rott. before adding water next allow to dry.

a half diluted cactus fertilizer can be given monthly in spring/summer and every six to eight weeks in fall/winter.

gasterhaworthia “fandango” can be grown at room temperature the year round or wintered at 10-15 °c/50-59 °f. now it needs to be less watered and must not be fed.

gasterhaworthia fandango

progation

propagation can be done with leaf cuttings or offsets.

gasteria carinata

the genus gasteria belongs to the asphodelaceae family and contains about 22 species, native to south africa. a common name i havn’t found but sometimes gasteria carinata is called pencil leaf or octongue. there are some cultivars available with yellow or white variegated leaves.

care

gasteria carinata does best in bright and indirect light with some morning and/or evening sun. if not variegated it tolerates a half shady place. during the summer you can place it at a rain protected place in the garden or on the balcony.

the soil should be well drained, a standard cactus potting mix can be used. give as much water until it flows out the pot’s bottom hole. before watering next allow to dry.

a cactus fertilizer can be given in 1/4 to a 1/2 concentration. during spring and summer monthly and if placed at room temperature during the winter every six to eight weeks. re-potted plants don’t need fertilizer for the first eight weeks.

gasteria carinata can be placed at 10-15 ° C (50-59 °f) in winter. then the soil must kept nearly dry without fertilizing.

propagation

gasteria carinata can be propagated by seeds, division or with leaf cuttings.

gasteria disticha

the approx. 22 members of the genus gasteria are native to the southern africa. there are some varieties of gasteria disticha available.

care

gasteria disticha does best in bright and indirect light with some morning and/or evening sun. a light shaded position will be tolerated. if placed outside in summer make sure that rain water can easily flow out of the pot.

the soil should be well drained, a standard cactus mix can be used. drench it well, what’s flowing out of the pot’s hole must be removed after a few minutes. wet legs can cause rot. before adding water next allow to dry.

a cactus fertilizer at half strength can be given monthly during spring/summer monthly and if placed at room temperature in fall/winter every six to eight weeks. recently bought or repotted plants don’t need fertilizer for the first six to eight weeks.

gasteria disticha can be placed at 10-15 ° C (50-59 °f) in winter. then the soil has to be kept nearly dry, a fertilizer must not be given.

gasteria disticha

propagation

the propagationof gasteria disticha can be done with seeds, leaf cuttings or by division.

gasteria maculata

the leaves of the south african native gasteria maculata are dark green and white mottled. there are some cultivars with white to yellow stripes available.

care

gasteria maculata can be located from bright to light shaded but does best in bright and indirect light with some morning and/or evening sun. during the summer you can place it at a rain protected place in the garden or on the balcony.

it needs a well drained soil with some coarse sand and grit. a standard cactus potting mix can be used. it can be deep watered, what’s running out of the pot’s hole should be removed after a few minutes. wet legs can cause rot. before watering next allow to dry.

a cactus fertilizer can be given in 1/4 to a 1/2 concentration. during spring and summer monthly and if placed at room temperature during the winter every six to eight weeks. recently bought or re-potted plants don’t need fertilizer for the first eight weeks.

gasteria maculata can be placed at 10-15 ° C (50-59 °f) in winter. then the soil must kept nearly dry without fertilizing.

gasteria maculata

propagation

the propagation of gasteria maculata can be done with seeds, division or with leaf cuttings.

graptopetalum paraguayense – ghost plant

the genus graptopetalum contains approx. 16 members and belongs to the crassulaceae family. they resemble to the echeverias. the crossings of both are named x graptoveria. graptopetalum paraguayense is commonly known as ghost plant or mother of pearl plant and is native to mexico.

graptopetalum paraguayense care

the ghost plant grows best if located bright and sunny throughout the year. a light shaded place will be tolerated. during summer it can be placed in the garden. but please make sure that rainwater can easily run out of the pot because wet legs will cause rotten roots.

a standard cactus soil or a mix between humus, sand and gritty (2:1:1) can be used. from spring to fall graptopetalum paraguayense can be deep watered. whats flowing out of the pot must be removed after a few minutes. allow to dry before watering next.

a half diluted cactus fertilizer can be given monthly from spring to fall. fresh bought or recently repotted plants don’t need to be fed for the first six to eight weeks.

for showing its inflorescence in spring, a cold winter location may be helpful. graptopetalum paraguayense can be placed at 5-10 °c (41-50 °f). at this temperature range it has to be kept nearly dry and don’t need to be fed. if placed at room temperature during winter, give it as much light as you can.

propagation

the ghost plant can be propagated with stem or leaf cuttings and seeds.

ledebouria socialis – silver squill

the first time i saw the silver squill (ledebouria socialis) it remembered me a bit on an orchid. but it belongs to the hyacinthaceae familiy. this beautiful housplant is native to south africa and also known under its old name scilla violacea.

care

growing the silver squill is not difficult. it does best on a bright place with some morning and/or evening sun. but it also grows on a half shady place.

the bulbs should be mostly out of the soil because if completely buried they tend to rot.

ledebouria socialis needs a well drained potting mix. you can use cacti soil or mix some regular soil with sand and crushed rocks.

keep the soil moist but not wet and allow to dry between waterings. when in growth the silver squill can fed monthly in half of by the manufacturer indicated concentration.

propagation

new bulbs can be separated from the parent plant.

lepismium monacanthum

lepismium monacanthum (syn. rhipsalis monacantha) is native to bolivia and argentina where it grows mostly epiphytic (sitting on trees). its stems are flat or three-angled and can get more than 40 cm/15 inches long. there are two subspecies (ssp. monacanthum and ssp. espinosa), both flowering in orange. young plants are growing erect, older ones hanging.

care

lepismium monacanthum does best on a sunny to bright location. during summer it can be placed outside, but make sure that rainwater can easily flow out of the pot. to avoid burned leaves it should slowly be adapted to the direct sun.

it needs a well drained soil, there are special mixes for epiphytic cacti available. if you want to mix your own, you can use humus, orchid bark and grit (2:1:1).

keep it moist but not wet, water running out of the pot should be removed after a few minutes. before watering next allow to dry. sitting in water can cause rotten roots.

a half strength cactus fertilizer can be given monthly in spring and summer and every six to eight weeks in fall and winter (if placed at room temperature).

lepismium monacanthum needs a winter minum of 15 °c/59 °f. if placed at this temperature give less water and don’t feed.

for flowering a night time heating reduction in spring can be positive.

propagation

lepismium monacanthum can be propagated with seeds or cuttings.

pachyphytum bracteosum

what makes pachyphytum bracteosum such an attractive houseplant are its green grey leaves and the purpelish flowers shown in spring.

care

pachyphytum bracteosum does best if located bright and sunny the year round. a light shaded place will be tolerated. during summer it can be given outside. but please make sure that rainwater can run out of the pot because wet legs will cause root rott.

a standard cactus soil or a mix between humus, sand and gritty (2:1:1) can be used. from spring to fall this succulent can be deep watered. whats running out of the pot’s hole should be removed after a few minutes. before adding water next allow to dry.

a cactus fertilizer at half strength can be given from spring to fall. fresh bought or recently repotted plants don’t need to be fed for the first six to eight weeks.

for showing its inflorescence in spring, a cold winter location may be helpful. pachyphytum bracteosum can be placed at 5-10 °c (41-50 °f). at this temperature range it has to be kept nearly dry, a fertilizer must not be given. if placed at room temperature during winter, give it as much light as you can.

the leaves of pachyphytum bracteosum are breaking off very easily. so be careful when re-potting.

propagation

propagation can be done with seeds or leaf cuttings.

pachyphytum compactum

pachyphytum compactum is a succulent plant with distinctively patterned fat leaves. a common name for this mexican native i havn’t found.

care

pachyphytum compactum likes a bright and sunny place throughout the year. light shade will be tolerated. during summer it can be placed outside. please make sure that rainwater can run out of the pot because wet legs can cause root rott.

a standard cactus soil or a mix between humus, sand and gritty (2:1:1) can be used. it can be deep watered from spring to fall, what runs out of the pot’s hole should be removed after a few minutes. allow to dry before watering next.

from spring to fall it can be fed monthly with a half diluted cactus fertilizer. recently repotted or bought plants don’t a fertilizer for the first six to eight weeks.

for showing its inflorescence in spring, a cold winter location may be helpful. pachyphytum compactum can be placed at 5-10 °c (41-50 °f). at this temperature range it has to be kept nearly dry, a fertilizer must not be given. if placed at room temperature during winter, give it as much light as you can.

the leaves of this beautiful succulent houseplant are breaking off very easily so be careful when re-potting.

pachyphytum compactum

propagation

propagation can be done by seeds or leaf cuttings.

pachyphytum oviferum – moon stones

the genus pachyphytum belongs to the crassulaceae family. the moon stones (pachyphytum oviferum) are native to mexiko. its orange to red flowers are shown in spring.

care

pachyphytum oviferum does best on a sunny location. but it also grows on a bright to light shaded place. during summer it can be placed on the balcony or in the garden. but make sure that rainwater can easily run out of the pot because sitting in water will cause rotten roots.

a standard cactus soil or a mix between humus, sand and gritty (2:1:1) can be used. if the plant is in active growth (spring to fall) it can be deep watered. whats running out of the pot’s hole must be removed after a few minutes. before adding water next allow to dry.

the moon stones can be fed monthly with a half diluted cactus fertilzer if they are in active growth. recently bought or repotted plants don’t need to be fertilized for the first six to eight weeks.

for showing its inflorescence in spring, a cold winter location may be helpful. pachyphytum oviferum can be placed at 5-10 °c (41-50 °f). at this temperature range it has to be kept nearly dry, a fertilizer must not be given. if placed at room temperature during winter, give it as much light as you can.

pachyphytum oviferum moonstones

propagation

moon stones can be propagated by seeds, leaf or stem cuttings.

peperomia columella

peperomia columella has small, fleshy leaves and is native to peru. in its natural habitat this succulent species is growing between rocks and cliffs.

peperomia columella care

peperomia columella grows best if located bright and sunny throughout the year. if placed outside during summer and to avoid rotten roots, make sure that rain water can flow out of the pot’s hole. a light shaded place will be tolerated.

the soil should be well drained, im using a mix of some gritty, sand and humus. a regular cactus mix can also be used.

from spring to fall peperomia columella can be deep watered. what’s running out of the pot should be removed after a few minutes. before watering next allow to dry.

a half diluted cactus fertilizer can be given monthly from spring to fall. fresh bought or recently repotted plants don’t need to be fed for the first six to eight weeks.

if you can give em enough light, peperomia columella can be cultivated at room temperature throughout the year. if not, it should be placed at approx. +/-10 °c (59 °f). it now has to be kept nearly dry, a fertilizer must not be given.

peperomia columella

propagation

peperomia columella can be propagated with cuttings.

rhipsalis baccifera – mistletoe cactus

the genus rhipsalis contains approx. 40 species. they grow either epiphytic (on trees), epilithic (on rocks) or terrestrial (on the ground). as houseplants they became popular more and more the past years. the mistletoe cactus (rhipsalis baccifera) is developing small white to yellow flowers.

more info about the members of the genus rhipsalis you can find here: rhipsalis.net.

rhipsalis elliptica

rhipsalis elliptica is an epiphytic cactus (“growing on trees”), native to brazil. its producing oblong to elliptic, flat and broad joints. more info about the care and propagation of rhipsalis cacti you can find here.

sansevieria concinna – snake plant

what differs sansevieria concinna from the other snake plants are its spoon shaped leaves. it’s available in different sizes and also as variegated cultivar (very hard to get).

care

sansevieria concinna does good on a bright to light shaded place with indirect sunlight. if protected from afternoon sun it can be placed outside during summer. but give it back inside if the temperature is falling under 15 °c (59 °f) constantly.

a good drained soil is welcome, you can use a standart cactus mix or a mix with some humus, sand and gritty.

it likes to be good watered and the soil should dry out before watering next. wet legs can cause root rot.

sansevieria concinna can be fed with a half concentrated cactus fertilizer. monthly during spring/summer and every six to eight weeks in fall/winter (if placed at room temperature).

it needs a winter minimum of 15 °c (59 °f). if placed at this temperature keep nearly dry and don’t feed.

pragation

sansevieria concinna can be propagated by division and with leaf cuttings.

sansevieria cylindrica – cylindrical snake plant

this plant became popular more and more over the past few years and now there are a lot of cultivars available. sansevieria cylincdrica is known as cylindrical snake plant, african spear or sometimes spear sansevieria.

care

sansevieria cylindrica grows best in full sunlight. a light shaded place will be tolerated. during the summer it can be placed in the garden, but make sure that rainwater can run out of the pot because sitting in water can cause root rot.

it needs a well drained soil, a regular cactus mix or a mix between humus, gritty and some sand can be used.

the cylindrical snake plant needs to be good watered, what runs out of the pot’s hole should be removed after a few minutes. let it dry out before watering next.

a half concentrated cactus fertilizer can be given monthly and if placed at room temperature during fall/winter every six to eight weeks.

sansevieria cylindrica can be cultivated at room temperature the whole year through with a winter minimum of +/-15 °C (59 °f). if placed colder during winter it needs less watering, a fertilizer must not be given.

propagation

the cylindrical snake plant can be propagated by division or leaf cuttings.

sansevieria raffillii – snake plant

this snake plant (sansevieria raffillii) has glaucous leaves with dark mottling. its native to kenya.

care

sansevieria raffillii does best on a sunny to bright location throughout the year. if placed outside in summer, make sure that water can flow out of the pot. bring back inside if the temperature is falling below 10 °c/50 °f constantly.

the snake plant needs a well drained soil, a regular cactus mix can be used. it need to be good watered, whats flowing out of the pot should be removed after a few minutes. wet legs can cause rotten roots. allow to dry before adding water next.

in spring/summer a half diluted cactus fertilizer can be given monthly. if placed at room temperature in fall/winter every six to eight weeks.

sansevieria raffillii likes can be cultivated at room temperature throughout the year with a winter minimum of 14 °c/57 °f. if wintering colder it needs less watering and no feeding.

sansevieria raffillii snake plant
sansevieria raffillii var. glauca

propagation

the snake plant can be propagated by leaf cuttings or division.

sansevieria trifasciata – snake plant, mother-in-law tongue

the snake plant (sansevieria trifasciata) is a houseplant classic that was forgotten for some years and is now becoming more popular with a lot of new cultivars available. it’s also known under the name mother-in-law tongue. this succulent is native to africa.

there are a lot of cultivars around with more yellowish or white striped leaves. very popular are the dwarf “hahnii” forms.

care

the snake plant does best on a bright and sunny place. especially the coloured cultivars need some more light for building up the variegation. a half shady place will be tolerated. during the summer they can be put in the garden or on the balcony.

sansevieria trifasciata needs a well drained soil. good works a mix between humus or garden soil, sand and crushed rocks. keep it moist bu not wet and allow to dry before the next watering. overwatering (especially on a colder place during winter) can cause root rot.

a water soluble or cacti fertilizer in half of by the manufacturer indicated concentration can be given monthly. if at room temperature at winter time every six to eight weeks.

the snake plant can be placed on +/- 15 °c (59 °f) during the winter. then it needs less watering and no fertilizing.

propagation

the mother-in-law tongue can be propagated by seeds, division or leaf cuttings.

sedum burrito – burro’s tail

the burro’s tail (sedum burrito) is an easy to care houseplant, native to mexico. it’s suitable for a hanging basekt.

care

the burro’s tail likes a bright and sunny place. during summer it can be placed outside, but give it back when the temperature is falling below 10 °c/50 °f constantly. make sure that rainwater can easily flow out of the pot.

the soil should be well drained, a regular cactus mix or a mix between humus, sand and gritty (2:1:1) can be used.

during spring/summer sedum burrito needs to be good waterd, what runs out of the pot’s hole should be removed after a few minutes. overwatering can cause rotten roots. before adding water next allow to dry.

in spring and summer a half strength standard or cactus fertilizer can be given monthly.

for blooming in spring, sedum burrito should be placed at 10-15 °c/50-59°f during winter. now it has to be kept nearly dry, without fertilizing. if placed warmer give it as much light as you can.

burros tail sedum

propagation

the burro’s tail can be propagated by seeds, stem or leaf cuttings.

sedum rubrotinctum – pork and beans

the genus sedum belongs to the crassulaceae family and contains more than 400 members. some of them are popular garden plants and really frost tolerant. the pork and beans or sometimes called jelly bean (sedum rubrotinctum) is a mexican native. there are cultivars with more yellow or red leaves available.

care

the pork and beans does best from full to partial sunlight. especially the red cultivars can loose their coloring if placed too dark. during summer you can give it in the garden or on the balcony. but make sure that the pot isn’t sitting in water after it has rained.

sedum rubrotinctum needs a well drained soil, a standart cactus mix or a mix between humus, sand and gritty (2:1:1) can be used.

during spring/summer it needs to be good waterd, what runs out of the pot’s hole should be removed after a few minutes. wet legs can cause rotten roots. allow to dry before watering next.

a half diluted standard or cactus fertilizer can be given monthly in spring and summer.

for blooming in spring, sedum rubrotinctum should be wintered at 10-15 °c (50-59°f). it has to be kept nearly dry and must not be fed. if placed warmer give it as much light as you can.

sedum rubrotinctum pork and beans
sedum rubrotinctum “rosea”

progation

the pork and beans can be propagated by seeds or leaf cuttings.