aglaonema crispum – chinese evergreen

the genus aglaonema belongs to the araceae family and contains about 40 species. some of them are popular houseplants or used as office plants because they tolerate some poor conditions. but if you like to have a healthy and beauitful plant, give it some care. they are native to the tropical asia.

the chinese evergreen (aglaonema crispum) is available in a lot of varieties with silver or light green variegated leaves.

care

aglaonema crispum is tolerating low light but does best if located bright without direct sun. the variegated cultivars will need low to moderate light otherwise they can produce solid green leaves.

the chinese evergreen can be grown in a good regular potting mix. keep it constantly moist but not wet, sitting in water can cause rot. a moderate drying between the waterings is ok, but the soil shouldn’t dry completely.

a half diluted water soluble fertilizer can be given monthly in spring/summer and every six to eight weeks in fall/winter. new bought or recently repotted plants don’t need to be fed for the first six to eight weeks.

aglaonema crispum likes it warm (20-25 °c/68-77 °f) and needs a winter minimum of 14 °c/57 °c.

a high humidty is welcome but not needed. spraying it over with water keeps its leaves free from dust.

aglaonema crispum

propagation

aglaonema crispum can be propagated with cuttings or by division.

anthurium andraeanum – flamingo flower

the genus anthurium belongs to the araceae family and contains more than 800 members. most of them are native to the rain forests of central to south america. anthurium andraeanum is commonly known as flamingo flower. there are cultivars with a white or pink spadix available.

care

the flamingo flower does best if located in bright light without direct sun. but it also can be placed from light shaded to shaded.

it can be grown in a good regular potting mix. this has to be kept evenly moist but not wet, sitting in water can cause rotten roots. a slightly drying of the soil’s surface between watering will be tolerated, but it shouldn’t dry completely.

anthurium andraeanum welcomes a high humidity. it can be increased by spraying it over with water every day or placing the pot on a large plant saucer, filled with water. to assure that the pot do not contact the water put it in a smaller plant saucer.

it can be fed with a water soluble fertilizer at half strength. monthly in spring and summer and every six to eight weeks in fall and winter.

the flamingo flower likes it warm throughout the year with a winter minimum of 15 °c/59 °f.

propagation

the flamingo flower can be propagated with cuttings or by division.

aspidistra – cast iron plant

the genus aspidistra belongs to the ruscaceae family and contains approx. 80 members, all native to east asia. they are commonly known as cast iron plants. there are also some cultivars, with white/creamish stripped or dotted leaves available. find more info about these plants here: aspidistra care.


aspidistra elatior

asplenium nidus – bird’s nest fern

the genus asplenium contains about 700 species and some of them are called bird’s nest fern. the most famous species asplenium nidus is a very popular houseplant. it can produce leaves up to 1 m in length.

care

the bird’s nest fern can be placed from bright to full shade, without direct sunlight. but it’s doing best in bright to light shade.

asplenium nidus can be planted in a good regular potting soil or a mix between humus, gritty and some sand (3:1:1).

keep the soil evenly moist but not wet, sitting in water can cause root rot. also avoid a complete dry out.

a half concentrated water soluble fertilizer can be given monthly.

the bird’s nest fern likes it warm throughout the year with a winter minimum of 15 °c (59 °f). it loves to be sprayed over with water regularly. to keep its leaves free from dust, a weekly shower can be given.

asplenium nidus nest fern

begonia albo-picta – bambusiforme begonia

the bambusiforme begonia (begonia albo-picta) is native to brazil and available with white, orange or pink flowers. the leaves are white spotted. it can be used as a houseplant or annual and is suitable for a hanging basket.

care

begonia albo-picta does best on a bright location with partial sun (morning/evening). a light shaded place will be tolerated. in summer it can be placed outside, but give it back when temperature is falling below 14 °c/57 °f constantly.

a good regular potting mix can be used. this should be kept moist but not wet. drying at the soil’s surface is ok, but it shouldn’t dry out. overwatering can cause rotten roots.

in spring and summer a half strength water soluble fertilizer can be given monthly, and if placed at room temperature in fall and winter every six to eight weeks.

begonia albo-picta likes room temperatur the year round with a minium of 14 °c/57 °f. if placed at this temperature range in winter, it needs less watering and no fertilizer.

spraying it over with water from time to time keeps its leaves free from dust.

propagation

begonia albo-picta can be propageted by seeds, leaf or stem cuttings.

begonia semperflorens – wax begonia

the wax begonia (begonia semperflorens) is a very popular garden plant which also can be used indoor. there are a lot of cultivars available, with green or reddish colored leaves and pink, white or red flowers. the easy to care plant is native to brazil.

care

the wax begonia does best on a bright to light shaded place with partial sun in the morning and/or evening. the green leaved cultivars are also growing in shade.

it can be planted in a regular potting soil which can be mixed with a part of coarse sand.

keep it moist but not wet and avoid overwatering such as drying out completely. the drying of the soil’s surface will be tolerated.

a half diluted water soluble fertilizer can be given monthly in spring/summer and every six to eight weeks in fall/winter. if placed colder at this time, begonia semperflorens don’t need to be fed.

it can be placed at room temperature throughout the year with a winter minumum of 15 °c/59 °f.

propagation

the wax begonia can be propagated by seeds or cuttings.

calathea crocata – eternal flame

the native to brazil calathea crocata is commonly known as eternal flame. its puckered ribbed leaves have maroon undersides, the flowers are orange/yellow. during the night it closes up the leaves.

Calathea crocata

care

the eternal flame (calathea crocata) can be placed from bright to light shaded without afternoon sun (to avoid leaf burn). some morning and/or evening sun will be tolerated.

a good regular potting mix can be used. it has to be kept evenly moist but not wet. sitting in water can cause rot. the drying of the soil’s surface between the waterings is ok, but it shouldn’t dry completely.

a water soluble fertilizer at half strenght can be given monthly in spring/summer and every six to eight weeks in fall/winter.

spraying calathea crocata over with water regularly increases humidity and keeps its leaves dust free.

it likes room temperature round the year and needs a winter minimum of 15 °c/59 °f.

for blooming some weeks of total darkness for 12-14 hours every day can be helpful.

calathea crocata

propagation

calathea crocata can be propagated by division.

calathea orbifolia – prayer plant

this prayer plant (calathea orbifolia) is native to bolivia. its leaves are rounded and light green colored with dark green stripes.

calathea orbifolia care

calathea orbifolia does best if located bright without afternoon sun. some morning or evening sun such as a light shaded place will be tolerated. but too much sun can cause burned leaves.

a regular potting mix can be used. keep it evenly moist but not wet. the roots should not be soaked with standing water. the drying of the soil’s surface between the waterings is ok. but it shouldn’t dry completely.

in spring/summer a half diluted water soluble fertilizer can be given monthly and every six to eight weeks in fall/winter. recently bought or repotted plants don’t need to be fed for the first six to eight weeks.

calathea orbifolia welcomes a high humidity and high temperatures the year round. to increase the humidity level it can be placed in a saucer, filled with water, small stones or pepples. but make sure that the pot is not sitting right into the water. spraying it over daily may also be helpful. a winter minimum of 15 °c/59 °f is needed.

calathea orbifolia

propagation

calathea orbifolia can be propagated by division.

calathea roseopicta – peacock plant

calathea roseopicta is commonly known as peacock plant. there are a lot of culitvars available.

care

the peacock plant (calathea roseopicta) does best if located bright without afternoon sun. some morning or evening sun such as a light shaded place will be tolerated. but too much sun can cause leaf burn.

a regular potting mix can be used. keep it evenly moist but not wet. sitting in water can cause rotten roots. the drying of the soil’s surface between the waterings is ok. but it shouldn’d dry completely.

in spring/summer a half diluted water soluble fertilizer can be given monthly and every six to eight weeks in fall/winter. recently bought or repotted plants don’t need to be fed for the first six to eight weeks.

calathea roseopicta welcomes a high humidity. to increase the level it can be placed in a saucer, filled with water, small stones or pepples. but make sure that the pot is not sitting right into the water. spraying it over daily may also be helpful.

calathea roseopicta likes room temperature the year round and needs a winter minimum of 15 °c/59 °f.

calathea “medaillon”

calathea “rosastar”

propagation

progation can be done by division.

calathea rufibarba – furry feather calathea

the laeves and stems of calathea rufibarba are covered with tiny hairs. this is why it’s sometimes called furry feather calathea. the genus calathea belongs to the marantaceae family and their members are folding up its leaves during the night.

care

a bright to light shade place without direct sun is welcome. some morning and/or evening sun will be tolerated.

the furry feather calathea can be planted in a good regular potting mix. keep it constantly moist and avoid overwatering such as drying out. sitting in water can cause root rot.

a half diluted water soluble fertilizer can be given monthly in spring/summer and every six to eight weeks during fall/winter. there is no need to feed for the first six to eight weeks if you have recently re-potted.

calathea rufibarba likes it warm with a minimum of 15 °c (59 °f) in fall/winter. spraying it over with water increases humidity and keeps its leaves free from dust.

calathea rufibarba

propagation

the furry feather calathea can be propagated by division.

calathea warscewiczii – calathea

calathea warscewiczii is native to central america (panama, el salvador) and can get up to more than 1 m/3 feet tall. its leaves are velvety and dark green with bright green veins and a purple to maroon colored underside.

care

calathea warscewiczii is suitable for bright to light shaded places with some morning and/or evening sun. afternoon sun can burn its leaves.

it can be grown in a good regualr potting mix which has to be kept evenly moist but not wet. sitting in water can cause irreversible root damage. the drying of the soil’s surface will be tolerated, but it shouldn’t dry completely.

a water soluble fertilizer can be given monthly in spring/summer and every six to eight weeks in fall/winter. recently repotted or bought plants don’t need to be fed for the first six to eight weeks.

a high humidity is welcome, spraying calathea warscewiczii over with water keeps its leaves free from dust.

it likes room temperature throughout the year with a winter minimum of 15 °c/59 °f.

calathea warscewiczii

propagation

calathea warscewiczii can be propagated by division.

calathea zebrina – zebra plant

calathea zebrina is commonly known as zebra plant. this name is based on the zebra stripped leaves. its inconspicuous flowers are shown in springtime.

care

the zebra plant (calathea zebrina) can be placed from bright to light shaded but does best on a bright position without afternoon sun. some morning and/or evening sun will be tolerated. too much sun can cause leaf burn.

it can be grown in a regular potting mix. keep it evenly moist but not wet. sitting in water can cause rotten roots. the drying of the soil’s surface between the waterings is ok but it shouldn’d dry completely.

a half diluted water soluble fertilizer can be given monthly in spring/summer and every six to eight weeks in fall/winter. recently bought or repotted plants don’t need to be fed for the first six to eight weeks.

a high humidity is welcome. to add moisture to the air the zebra plant can be placed in a saucer, filled with water, small stones or pepples. but make sure that the pot is not sitting right into the water. spraying it over daily can also be helpful.

calathea zebrina likes room temperature round the year and needs a winter minimum of 15 °c/59 °f.

calathea zebrina

propagation

calathea zebrina can be propagated by division.

callisia repens – bolivian jew, turtle vine

the native to central and south america callisia repens is known under a lot of common names, like bolivian jew, turtle vine, itsy bitsy inch vine or baby’s tears. it’s suitable for a hanging basekt.

care

callisia repens likes a bright position with some morning and/or evening sun throughout the year. during summer it should be protected from afternoon sun.

it can be grown in a good regular potting mix. keep it constantly moist but not wet, because sitting in water can cause rotten roots. the drying of the soil’s surface between the waterings will be tolerated, but it shouldn’t dry completely.

a water soluble fertilizer at half strength can be given monthly during spring/summer and if placed at room temperature in fall/winter every six to eight weeks.

callisia repens can be grown at room temperature the year round but also can be placed between 15-18 °c/59-64 °f in wintertime. at this temperature it needs to be less watered, a fertilizer must not be given. but even now, the complete drying of the soil must be avoided.

callisia repens

propagation

callisia repens can be propagated by seeds or cuttings.

chamaedorea elegans – neanthe bella palm, parlour palm

chamaedorea elegans, better known als neanthe bella palm, parlour palm and sometimes good luck palm is a very popular houseplant because it’s easy to grow. it is native to the latin american rain forests and can get two to three meters tall.

care

the neanthe bella palm likes a bright to half shady place without sun. the sun will bleach its leaves. it needs room temperature throughout the year and a winter minium of 15 °c (59 °f).

chamaedorea elegans can be plantet in a regular potting mix. keep the soil constantly moist but not wet, “wet legs” over a long time can cause root rot.

if placed at room temperatur water soluble fertilizer can be given monthly (spring, summer) and every six to eight weeks during fall and winter. in half of by the manufacturer indicated concentration.

the neanthe bella palm likes it when it’s sprayed from time to time. this also keeps the leaves free of dust.

propagation

chamaedorea elegans can be propagated by seeds.

chirita sinensis

the genus chirita belongs to the gesneriaceae family and contains approx. 150 members. they are related to the african violet. the native to china chirita sinensis is probably the most widely cultivated species. there are a lot of cultivars available, some of them with a silver pattern on green leaves, flowering in white, purple or pink.

chirita sinensis

chirita sinensis care

chirita sinensis does best if located bright but protected from afternoon sun. a bit of morning or evening sun, such as a light shaded place will be tolerated.

it can be grown in a standart potting soil or in a special mix for african violets. i’m using a mix of potting soil, sand and grit (3:1:1).

keep it evenly moist but not wet. sitting in water can cause rotten roots. the drying of the soil’s surface between the waterings is ok. but it shouldn’t dry in complete.

in spring/summer a water soluble fertilizer at half strength can be given monthly and if placed at +/-20 °c/68 °f in fall/winter every six to eight weeks. new bought or recently repotted plants don’t need to be fed for the first six to eight weeks.

chirita sinensis can be cultivated at room temperature the year round and needs a winter minimum of approx. 15 °c/59 °f. at this temperature range, watering can be reduced, a fertilizer must not be given. but the soil should not dry out completely. a somewhat cooler winter location can have a positive impact on blooming in spring.

chirita sinensis leaf

chirita sinensis care propagation

chirita sinensis can be grown from seeds or leaf cuttings. the procedure is the same as for african violets.

clivia miniata – bush lily, kaffir lily

the genus clivia belongs to the amaryllidaceae family and contains six species. the bush lily (clivia miniata), also known as kaffir lily is native to south africa. there are cultivars with red, orange or yellow flowers available.

care

the bush lily likes a bright but not sunny location, a light shaded place will be tolerated.

the soil should be well drained, you can use a standard potting soil mixed with some sand (3:1).

keep it moist but not wet. water running out of the pot’s hole should be removed after a few minutes. let it moderately dry before watering next.

clivia miniata can be fed monthly during summer, with a half concentrated water soluble fertilizer.

in winter the bush lily can be placed at 12-16 °c (54-61 °f). it now has to be kept moderately dry without fertilizing. blooming time is in spring.

propagation

the bush lily (clivia miniata) can be propagated by seeds. older plants can be divided.

clusia major – pitch apple, autograph tree

the pitch apple (clusia major) is also known as balm apple, fat park tree or, because people are writing messages into its glossy leaves, autograph tree. it is native to the tropical middle america and can get approx. 20 m/65 ft tall in its natural habitat. there is a cultivar with green-yellow variegated leaves available.

care

the pitch apple is suitable for sunny to light shaded locations. to avoid burned leaves, new bought plants should get some time to adapt full sun. especially if placed outside during summer. for showing its colorful fooliage the variegated cultivar shouldn’t be placed too dark.

a regular potting mix can be used. it should be kept moist but not wet and can dry before adding water next. wet legs can cause rotten roots.

during the spring and summer clusia major can be fed every two to four weeks and if placed at room temperature every four to six weeks in fall and winter. with a half diluted water soluble fertilizer.

it can be cultivated at room temperature throughout the year and needs a winter minimum of 15 °c/59 °c. if wintered at this temperature it needs less watering and must not be fed.

a medium humidity is welcome. spraying it over with water or giving a shower keeps its leaves free from dust.

clusia major pitch apple

propagation

clusia major can be propagated with cuttings.

codiaeum variegatum – croton

the croton (codiaeum variegatum) is the most common member of the genus, belonging to the euphorbiaceae family. there are a lot of cultivars availalbe, in nearly every color you want, with broad, small or twisted leaves. its leathery foliage is starting out green and developing more colorful as it matures.

care

for developing its colorful foliage the croton needs a bright and sunny location without afternoon sun. light shaded or shaded placed plants tend to develop more green leaves.

a good regular potting mix can be used. keep it evenly moist but not wet, sitting in water can cause rotten roots. a slightly drying of the soil’s surface between watering will be tolerated, but it shouldn’t dry completely.

a water soluble fertilizer at half strenght can be given monthly in spring and summer and every six to eight weeks in fall and winter (if placed at approx. 20 °c/68 °f).

codiaeum variegatum can be grown at room temperature the year round with a winter minimum of 16 °c/60 °f. if placed at this temperature range it needs less watering (but shouldn’t dry out at all) and no feeding.

a high humidity is welcome. it can be increased by spraying it over with water every morning or placing the pot on a large plant saucer, filled with water. to assure that the pot do not contact the water put it in a smaller plant saucer.

propagation

the croton can be propagated with cuttings.

cotyledon papillaris

the genus cotyledon belongs to the crassulaceae family and includes about 10 species that are primarily distributed in south africa.

plant care for cotyledon papillaris

cotyledon papillaris does good on a bright or light shaded place with partial sun (morning and/or evening).

it can be planted in regular cactus soil or a mix between humus, sand and gritty (2:1:1). drench the soil and remove water flowing out of the pot after a few minutes. wet legs can cause rotten roots. allow to dry before watering next.

a half diluted cactus fertilizer can be given monthly in spring/summer. when placed at room temperature every eight weeks in fall/winter. cotyledon papillaris can be placed on about 10-15 °c/50-59 °f at this time. then it needs less watering, a fertilizer must not be given.

cotyledon papillaris

propagation

cotyledon papillaris can be propagated by seeds, stem or leaf cuttings. before potting the cut end should dry out for 2-4 days on a bright but not sunny location.

ctenanthe burle-marxii – burle marx ctenanthe

the burle marx ctenanthe (ctenanthe burle-marxii) is native to brazil and available in different cultivars. during the night it’s folding up its leaves. staying on daytime can indicate that it needs some watering or is lacated to sunny.

care

ctenanthe burle-marxii likes a bright to light shaded location without direct sunlight. some morning and/or evening sun will be tolerated. the colored cultivars shouldn’t be placed to dark for building up its leaf color.

a regular potting mix can be used. keep it constantly moist but not wet. sitting in water can cause rotten roots. the drying of the soils surface will be tolerated but it shouldn’t completely dry.

a half strength water soluble fertilizer can be given monthly in spring and summer and every six to eight weeks in fall and winter. for recently re-potted or fresh bouhgt plants there is no need to feed for the first six to eight weeks.

the burle marx ctenanthe likes it warm and should not be placed under 15 °c (59 °f) for too long. spraying it over with water increases humidity and keeps its leaves free from dust.

ctenanthe burle-marxii
ctenanthe burle-marxii “amagris”

propagation

ctenanthe burle-marxii can easily be propagated by division.

dieffenbachia – dumb cane

the diffenbachia is a very popular houseplant and there are a lot of cultivars with leaves spotted or striped from white to yellow or green available. the common name dumb cane is based of the poisonous nature of their sap. the genus diffenbachia belongs to the araceae family and is native to the tropical america.

as indoor plants often used are cultivars of dieffenbachia amoena, d. bausei or d. seguine.

care

dieffenbachias like bright light without direct sun but do also good on a half shady place. if placed to dark they will grow a bit slower and the extreme white colored cultivars will show more greenish leaves.

they can be cultivated in a good regular potting mix which has to be kept constantly moist but not wet. overwatering can cause root rot. they also shouldn’t completely dry out.

a water soluble fertilizer can be given at a half strength monthly during spring/summer and every six to eight weeks in fall/winter. re-potted or fresh bought plants don’t need to be fed for the first eight weeks.

dumb canes like a warm place throughout the year with a winter minium of 15 °c (59 °f). if sprayed over with water regularly this keeps their leaves free from dust.


cuttings from d. oerstedii

propagation

dumb canes can be propagated by cuttings.

dracaena marginata – madagascar dragon tree

the genus dracaena contains about 40 species and belongs to the ruscaceae familiy. some of them are very popular houseplants. the madagascar dragon tree (dracaena marginata) is native to madagascar. there are some cultivars with variegated leaves (red or yellow edges).

care

the madagascar dragon tree does best on a bright to halfshady place without afternoon sun. some morning or evening sun will be tolerated. the variegated cultivars need a bit more light. during the summer it can be placed in the garden or on the balcony.

dracaena marginata can be cultivated at room temperature througout the year and a minimum of 14 °c (57.2 °f) during the winter.

keep the soil constantly moist but not wet. a regular potting mix can be used. from spring to the end of the summer water soluble fertilizer can be given every two to four weeks. during the winter every four to six weeks if dracaena marginata is placed at room temperature. if it’s placed colder there is no need for fertilization. i use the half concentration indicated by the manufacturer.

dragon tree dracaena marginata

propagation

stem cuttings can be put direct into moist soil.

dracaena surculosa – gold dust dracaena, spotted dracaena

on first sight you wouldn’t consider this houseplant to be a member of the genus dracaena. not only of the oval shaped leaves, with splotches of cream and green. because its stems ar looking a bit like a bamboo. dracaena surculosa is sometimes called gold dust dracaena or spotted dracaena. there are different cultivars available with spotted or striped leaves.

care

the gold dust dracaena likes to be placed bright without direct sun. a light shaded place will be tolerated. a too dark or a sunny place can cause leaf drop.

it can pe potted in a good regular mix. the soil should be kept evenly moist, its surface can dry between the waterings. avoid overwatering such as complete dry out.

a water soluble fertilizer can be given monthly during spring/summer and every six to eight weeks in fall/winter. use the half of the by the manufacturer indicated concentration. after re-potting there is no need to feed for the first six to eight weeks. the same applies for recently purchased plants.

dracaena surculosa likes to be placed at room temperature throughout the year with a winter minimum of 15 °c (59 °f). if placed a bit colder at this time there is no need to fertilize. spraying it over with water keeps its leaves free from dust.

propagation

the gold dust dracaena can be propagated by cuttings.

epipremnum aureum – pothos

the pothos (epipremnum aureum) is a nearly undestroyable indoor plant which tolerates some care mistakes. it’s also known as devil’s ivy or money plant. there are a lot of cultivars available with more yellowish or white variegated leaves. it’s native to southeastern asia.

care

the pothos does best in bright light with some morning and/or evening sun. but it can also placed half shady to shady. if standing too dark it will grow slower and the variegated ones will loose their color and produce mor green leaves.

epipremnum aureum can be grown in a regular potting mix. keep it moist but not wet. overwatering and drying out will be tolerated for some times.

a water soluble fertilizer can be given monthly and if placed a bit colder during winter every six to eight weeks.

there ist no need to increase humidity but if the pothos is sprayed over from time to time this keeps it’s leaves free from dust.

it can be placed at room temperatur througout the year with a winter minimum of 14 °c (52 °f). for a few days 10 °c or lower (50 °f) will be tolerated.

pothos epipremnum aureum

propagation

pothos (epipremnum aureum) can easily propagated with cuttings.

episcia cupreata – flame violet

the genus episcia belongs to the gesneriaceae family and contains approx. eight members, native to central and south america. they are commonly known as flame violets and are related to the african violet. there are a lot of episcia cupreata cultivars available with red or silver patterned leaves, flowering in orange, red or pink. mature plants are producing runners. they are suitable for hanging baskets.

episcia silver frog

episcia cupreata – flame violet care

the flame violet does best if located bright but protected from afternoon sun. a bit of morning/evening sun or a light shaded place will be tolerated.

it can be cultivated in a regular potting soil or a special mix for african violets. i’m using a mixture of potting soil, coarse sand and grit (3:1:1).

keep it evenly moist but not wet. sitting in water can cause rot. the drying of the soil’s surface between the waterings is ok. but it shouldn’t dry completely.

in spring/summer a half diluted water soluble fertilzer can be given monthly and if placed at >20 °c/68 °f in fall/winter every six to eight weeks. new bought or recently repotted plants don’t need to be fed for the first six to eight weeks.

episcia cupreata likes it warm the year round and needs a winter minimum of approx. 15 °c/59 °f. at this temperature range, watering can be reduced and there is no need to feed. but the soil should not dry out completely. a somewhat cooler winter location can have a positive impact on blooming in spring.

episcia-flower

propagation

episcia cupreata can be grown from seeds, stem or leaf cuttings. the procedure is the same as for the african violet.

euphorbia “diamond frost”

euphorbia “diamond frost” is a cultivar, based on e. hypericifolia. the easy to care houseplant is becoming popular more and more. here in germany it is sold as balcony plant.

care

euphorbia “diamond frost” is suitable for a sunny, bright, light shaded or shaded location. if placed sunny to light shaded it can be a non stop bloomer. on a shaded place it shows less flowers.

a regular potting soil or a mix between humus and a bit of sand (3:1) can be used. keep it moist but not wet, drying at the soils surface between the waterings will be tolerated.

in spring and summer a half diluted water soluble fertilizer can be given monthly. if placed at room temperature during fall/winter every six to eight weeks. on a colder winter location there is no need to feed.

euphorbia “diamond frost” can be cultivated at room temperature throughout the year but can be wintered at +/-10 °c/50 °f. then it needs less watering.

propagation

euphorbia “diamond frost” can be propagated by cuttings.

ficus benjamina – weeping fig, benjamin’s fig

the weeping or benjamin’s fig (ficus benjamina) is one of the most popularest house and office plants. there are a lot of culitvars with white or yellow variegated leaves available. the small ones can be used as indoor bonsai. its tolerating some poor growing conditions, but if you like to have a beautiful and healthy plant give it some care.

the weeping fig is native to asia and australia and can get till 30 meters (100 ft) tall in its natural habitat.

care

ficus benjamina does best in bright light with some morning and/or evening sun. but it also grows on a light shaded place. for building up their colored leaves the variegated cultivars shouldn’t be placed to dark. during summer it can be placed in the garden, but bring it in if the temperature is falling below 15 °c (59 °c) constantly.

a good regular potting mix can be used. keep it constantly moist but not wet and avoid overwatering or drying out. drying at the soil’s surface will be tolerated.

a half diluted water soluble fertilizer can be given monthly or every six to eight weeks during fall/winter. if placed colder at this time, there is no need to feed.

ficus benjamina likes to be placed warm throughout the year with a winter minumum of 15 °c (59 °f). to keep its leaves free from dust spray it over with water or give a shower. if becoming too tall it can easily be cutted back.

fresh bought or relocated plants sometimes drop some leaves but are producing new, if they have adapted to their new surroundings.


f. benjamina “variegata”

propagation

the benjamin’s fig can be propagated by seeds or cuttings.

ficus elastica – rubber fig

the rubber fig (ficus elastica) is a houseplant which was very popular in the 1950’s. its leaves can get more than 30 cm/12 inchs long, but there are cultivars with smaller or variegated leaves available. it is native to india and indonesia. other common names: rubber plant or indian rubber bush.

care

the rubber fig can be placed from bright to light shaded but does best on a bright location with some morning and/or evening sun. for building up their colored leaves the variegated cultivars shouldn’t be placed to dark.

a good regular potting mix can be used. keep it moist but not wet and avoid overwatering. drying at the soils surface will be tolerated but it shouldn’t dry completely.

a half diluted water soluble fertilizer can be given monthly (spring/summer) and avery six to eight weeks (fall/winter). if placed a bit cooler in winter it needs less watering and must not be fed.

the rubber fig likes room temperature throughout the year with a winter minimum of 15 °/59 °f.

spraying it over with water increases humidity and keeps its leaves dust free.

ficus elastica rubber fig

propagation

the rubber fig can be propagated by seeds or cuttings.

ficus lyrata – fiddle leaf fig

the fiddle leaf fig (ficus lyrata) is native to africa. its dark green and glossy leaves can get more than 40 cm/16 inches long. but there are smaller cultivars available.

care

ficus lyrata likes a bright location with partial sun (morning and/or evening), light shade will be tolerated. it needs room temperature throughout the year with a winter minimum of 15 °c/59 °f.

a regular potting mix can be used. keep it moist but not wet and avoid overwatering such as drying out completely. drying at the soils surface is ok.

a half strength water soluble fertilizer can be given monthly in spring/summer and every six to eight weeks in winter (if placed at room temperature). if placed at 15 °c/59 °f it must not be fed. a re-potted plant don’t needs to be fertilized for the first eight weeks.

the fiddle leaf fig loves to be sprayed over with water regularly. this also keeps its leaves dust free.

ficus lyrata fiddle leaf fig
ficus lyrata “bambino”

propagation

the fiddle leaf fig can be propagated by seeds or cuttings.

ficus microcarpa – chinese banyan, green island fig

the chinese banyan (ficus microcarpa) has a lot of names, sometimes it’s called malayan banyan, indian laurel or green island fig. here in germany it’s very popular under the name ficus ginseng. the not so easy to grow housplant is sometimes sold as indoor bonsai.

care

the chinese banyan does fine from bright (without afternoon sun) to light shade. i have two, one placed on a northern window and the other on the south side gets some evening sun. during summer it can be placed in light shade in the garden or on the balcony.

ficus microcarpa needs a medium humidity and likes if sprayed over with water sometimes. this also keeps the leaves free from dust.

it can be grown in a standard potting soil which can be mixed with some sand (3:1).

keep the soil moist but not wet and avoid overwatering. remove water running out of the pot’s hole after a few minutes. let it dry at the surface between the waterings. but it should not dry out completely.

a water soluble fertilizer can be given monthly (half concentrated) and every six to eight weeks if placed at room temperature during fall/winter.

the green island fig needs a winter minimum of 15 °c (59 °f).

to keep the bonsai in shape it should cutted back. if ficus microcarpa is placed at room temperarture this could be done throughout the year. otherwise it can be done in spring.

propagation

propagation can be done by seeds or cuttings.

fittonia verschaffeltii – mosaic plant, nerve plant

fittonias are commonly known as mosaic plant or nerve plant. there is a wide range of cultivars with a colorful fooliage available. fittonia verschaffeltii is native to peru.

care

fittonia verschaffeltii grows best if located bright and protected from direct sun. but it’s also suitable for light shaded to shaded positions.

it can be planted in a regular potting mix. keep it evenly moist but not wet, sitting in water can cause rot. the drying of the soil’s surface will be tolerated, but it shouldn’t dry completely.

a water soluble fertilizer at half strength can be given monthly from spring to fall and every six to eight weeks at winter time. recently bought or repotted plants don’t need to be fed for the first six to eight weeks.

the mosaic plant can be grown at room temperature the year round and needs a winter minimum of 15 °c/59 °f.

a high humidity is welcome. to promote denser foliage and shape plants the ends of growing stems can be pinched off.

fittonia verschaffeltii

propagation

fittonia verschaffeltii can easily be propagated with cuttings.

homalocladium platycladum – tapeworm plant, ribbon bush

the tapeworm plant (homalocladium platycladum) is native to the solomon islands. its common name is based on the flat leafless stems that resemble tapeworms. it’s also known as ribbon bush or centipede plant.

care

the tapeworm plant does best if located bright with some morning and/or evening sun. but it also can be grown on a light shaded place.

it can be planted in a standard potting mix. keep it evenly moist and because of rotten roots avoid overwatering. the drying of the soil’s surface will be tolerated, but it should not completely dry, this can cause leaf drop.

during spring and summer a water soluble fertilizer diluted at half can be given monthly and if placed at room temperatur in fall/winter every six to eight weeks. newly purchased or recently re-potted plants don’t need to be fed for the first six to eight weeks.

homalocladium platycladum can be cultivated at room temperature the year round with a winter minimum of 10 °c/59 °f. at this temperature range it needs less watering (but shouldn’t completely dry) and no fertilizing.

it likes a medium humidity and welcomes if sprayed over with water regularly.

propagation

the tapeworm plant (homalocladium platycladum) can be propagated with seeds or cuttings.

Houseplants

Plant care sheets for flowering or foliage houseplants.

Tip: https://maranta.net / How to care for Maranta, Calathea and other Prayer Plants.

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maranta leuconeura – prayer plant

what makes the prayer plant (maranta leuconeura) special is that it’s folding up the leaves in the evening and open it back again in the morning. if the leaves are staying during the day this can indicate that it’s placed too to sunny or needs some watering.

there are different colored cultivars available.

care

the prayer plant (maranta leuconeura) likes a bright place without sun. if placed sunny, the leaves can bleach. it likes room temperature throughout the year with a winter minimum of 15 °c (59 °f).

it can be planted in a standart potting mix. keep it constantly moist but not wet and avoid “wet legs” such as drying out.

to increase humidity the prayer plant can be sprayed over with water in the morning. this also keeps the leaves free from dust.

a water soluble fertilizer can be given monthly in half of the indicated concentration. after re-potting there is no need to feed for about six to eight weeks.

maranta leuconeura prayer plant

propagation

the prayer plant can easily be propagated with cuttings.

musa acuminata x zebrina – banana

musa acuminata x zebrina is a dwarf cultivar, based on the bananito (m. acuminata, australia) and the blood banana (m. zebrina, indonesia). the leaves are green with red spotches on the topside.

care

this banana is doing best on a sunny location the year round. a light shaded place will be tolerated, but then it’s growing slower and producing smaller leaves. during summer it can be placed outside untill the temperature is falling below 10 °c/50 °f constantly.

it can be planted in a good regular potting mix. keep it evenly moist but not wet, sitting in water can cause root rott. the drying of the soils surface is ok but it shouldn’t dry in complete.

during summer a half diluted water soluble fertilizer can be given every two to four and if placed at room temperature in fall and winter every four to six weeks.

the banana can be grown at room temperature the year round, but can also be located at +/-10 °c/50 °f during winter. if placed at this temperature range, it needs less watering and must not be fed.

musa likes to be sprayed over with water from time to time. this keeps its leaves free from dust.

musa acuminata x  zebrina banana

progation

pragation can be done by division or with seeds.

neoregelia carolinae – blushing bromeliad

the blushing bromeliad (neoregelia carolinae) is native to brazil where it grows epiphytic (sitting on trees). there are a lot of cultivars available with white striped, red or orange leaves. its nestled deep in the crown sitting blossom is not very showy.

care

the blushing bromeliad (neoregelia carolinae) does good on a bright location with partial sun (morning/evening). light shade will be tolerated. if placed too dark, the variegated cultivars can loose its colors.

it needs a fast draining soil. there are special mixes for epiphytic plants available. but you can also use a mix between some humus, orchid bark and a bit gritty. keep it moist but avoid overwatering. let the soil’s surface dry before watering again.

a half diluted water soluble fertilizer can be given every four to six weeks.

the blushing bromeliad likes to have some water in its crown. spraying it over with water increases humidity. it can be placed at room temperatur throughout the year with a winter minimum of 14 °c/57 °f.

neoregelia blushing bromeliad

propagation

neoregelia carolinae can be propagated with offsets.

nephrolepis exaltata – sword fern

the sword fern (nephrolepis exaltata), aka boston fern or fishbone fern is a very popular houseplant. there are cultivars with variegated or ruffled leaves available. it’s suitable for a hanging basket.

care

the sword fern (neprholepis exaltata) does good from bright indirect light to partial shade. some morning and/or evening sun is ok.

it can be planted in a regular potting soil or a mix between humus, gritty and sand (2:1:1). keep it evenly moist but not wet. the sword fern is more drought tolerant than other ferns so it’s no problem if the soil’s surface is drying between the waterings. but it shouldn’t completely dry out.

a half diluted water soluble fertilizer can be given monthly in spring/summer and every six/eight weeks during fall/winter (if placed at room temperature).

the sword fern can be wintered at +/-10 °c (50 °f). now it needs less watering (but no completely dry out) and must not be fed.

nephrolepis exaltata sword fern

propagation

nephrolepis exaltata can be propagated by division.

peperomia “bibi” – radiator plant

some members of the genus peperomia are commonly known as radiator plant. peperomia “bibi” is a cultivar, likely to be related with peperomia glabella. it’s suitable for a hanging basekt.

care

peperomia “bibi” can be placed from bright (with a bit morning and/or evening sun) to light shaded. but it’s doing best on a bright location.

a good regular potting mix can be used. keep it evenly moist but not wet. sitting in water can cause rotten roots. the drying of the soil’s surface will be tolerated.

a water soluble fertilizer at half strength can be given monthly in spring/summer and if placed at room temperature in fall/winter every six to eight weeks.

this radiator plant likes room temperature throughout the year, with a winter minimum of approx. 15 °c/59 °f. at this temperature range, watering can be reduced and there is no need to feed.

propagation

the radiator plant can be propagated with cuttings.

peperomia caperata – emerald ripple peperomia

the genus peperomia contains more than 1,000 members and some of them are popular houseplants because they do not demand a huge amount of care. the emerald ripple peperomia (peperomia caperata) is native to central america. it has dark green, heart shaped leaves. but there are cultivars available with red or pink, green and white splashes on their leaves.

care

the green emarald ripple peperomia can be located from bright (with some morning and/or evening sun) to light shaded. the colored cultivars are doing best on a bright position. if placed too dark, they can loose their color.

a good regular potting mix can be used. keep it evenly moist but not wet. sitting in water can cause rotten roots. the drying of the soil’s surface will be tolerated.

peperomia caperata can be fed monthly (spring/summer) with a half dulited water soluble fertilizer. if placed at room temperature in fall/winter it can be given every six to eight weeks.

it likes room temperature the year round, with a winter minimum of approx. 15 °c/59 °f. at this temperature range, watering can be reduced and there is no need to feed.

peperomia caperata - emerald ripple peperomia
p. caperata “schumi red”

propagation

peperomia caperata can be propagated with cuttings or seeds.

peperomia clusiifolia – red edge peperomia

the red edge peperomia (peperomia clusiifolia) is native to jamaica. there are some cultivars with red bordered leaves available.

care

peperomia clusiifolia can be located from bright (if protected from afternoon sun) to light shaded positions. some morning and/or evening sun will be tolerated. for showing its colorful fooliage the variegated cultivars need to be placed in bright light. otherwise the leaves will become green.

a good regular potting mix can be used. keep it evenly moist but not wet. sitting in water can cause root rot. the drying of the soil’s surface between the waterings will be tolerated.

a water soluble fertilizer at half strength can be given monthly in spring/summer and if placed at room temperature in fall/winter every six to eight weeks.

peperomia clusiifolia likes room temperature the year round, with a winter minimum of approx. 15 °c/59 °f. at this temperature range, watering can be reduced and there is no need to feed.

spraying it over with water from time to time increases humidity and keeps its leaves free from dust.

peperomia clusiifolia

propagation

the red edge peperomia can be propagated with cuttings.

peperomia maculosa – spotted peperomia

the spotted peperomia (peperomia maculosa) has dark green shiny leathery leaves. the easy to care houseplant is native to the tropical central and south america.

care

peperomia maculosa is doing best if located bright without afternoon sun. some morning and/or evening sun will be tolerated. but it can also be grown on a light shaded position.

a good regular potting mix can be used. keep it evenly moist but not wet. sitting in water can cause root rot. the drying of the soil’s surface will be tolerated.

a water soluble fertilizer at half strength can be given monthly in spring/summer and if placed at room temperature in fall/winter every six to eight weeks.

the spotted peperomia likes room temperature the year round, with a winter minimum of approx. 15 °c/59 °f. at this temperature range, watering can be reduced and there is no need to feed.

to keep its leaves free from dust it can be sprayed over with water from time to time.

peperomia maculosa spotted peperomia

propagation

the spotted peperomia (peperomia maculosa) can be propagated with cuttings.

peperomia magnoliifolia – spoonleaf peperomia

peperomia magnoliifolia is commonly known as spoonleaf peperomia. there are cultivars with yellow/red edges (cv. “tricolor”) or creme variegated leaves (cv. “green & gold”) available.

care

peperomia magnoliifolia is doing best if located bright without afternoon sun. some morning and/or evening sun will be tolerated. but it can also be grown on a light shaded position. for producing its colorful fooliage the variegated cultivars need to be placed in bright light. otherwise they are showing green leaves.

a good regular potting mix can be used. keep it evenly moist but not wet. sitting in water can cause root rot. the drying of the soil’s surface between the waterings will be tolerated.

a water soluble fertilizer at half strength can be given monthly in spring/summer and if placed at room temperature in fall/winter every six to eight weeks.

the spoon leaf peperomia likes room temperature the year round, with a winter minimum of approx. 15 °c/59 °f. at this temperature range, watering can be reduced and there is no need to feed.

a high humidity is welcome. spraying it over with water from time to time keeps its leaves free from dust.

peperomia magnoliifolia
peperomia magnoliifolia “variegata”

propagation

peperomia magnoliifolia can be propagated with cuttings.

peperomia meridana

peperomia meridana is available with green and yellow variegated leaves. a common name for this native to venezuela plant i havn’t found.

care

peperomia meridana does best if located bright but protected from afternoon sun. some morning and/or evening sun such as a light shaded place will be tolerated. for showing its colorful fooliage the variegated cultivars need to be placed in bright light. otherwise the leaves will become green.

a good regular potting mix can be used. keep it evenly moist but not wet. sitting in water can cause rotten roots. the drying of the soil’s surface between the waterings will be tolerated but it shouldn’t dry completely.

a half diluted water soluble fertilizer can be given monthly in spring/summer and if placed at room temperature in fall/winter every six to eight weeks.

peperomia meridana likes room temperature the year round, with a winter minimum of approx. 15 °c/59 °f. at this temperature range, watering can be reduced and there is no need to feed.

spraying it over with water from time to time increases humidity and keeps its leaves free from dust.

propagation

peperomia meridana can be propagated with cuttings.

peperomia obtusifolia – baby rubber plant

the baby rubber plant (peperomia obtusifolia) is the most common of the more than 1,000 species, belonging to the genus. it’s native to venezuela and there are numerous cultivars, with creamy white to yellow variegated leaves available.

care

the green form of peperomia obtusifolia can be located from partial sun (morning/evening) to light shade. for producing their variegation, the colored cultivars shouldn’t be placed too dark.

it can be grown in a good regular potting mix. which has to be kept evenly moist but not wet. wet legs can cause rotten roots. a short drying period will be tolerated.

in spring and summer the baby rubber plant can be fed monthly with a water soluble fertilizer at half strength. during fall and winter every six to eight weeks, if placed at room temperature.

it likes room temperature throughout the year, with a winter minimum of approx. 15 °c/59 °f. at this temperature range, it needs less water and and must not be fed.

peperomia obtusifolia - baby rubber plant
peperomia obtusifolia “usa”

propagation

the baby rubber plant can be propagated with cuttings or seeds.

peperomia rotundifolia – creeping peperomia

the rounded leaves of peperomia rotundifolia (creeping peperomia) are olive green. this low-growing creeping houseplant is suitable for a hanging basket.

peperomia rotundifolia care

peperomia rotundifolia does best if located bright but protected from afternoon sun. a light shaded place such as some morning and/or evening sun will be tolerated.

it can be grown in a good regular potting mix. keep it evenly moist but not wet. sitting in water can cause root rot. the drying of the soil’s surface between the waterings is ok. but it shouldn’t dry completely.

a water soluble fertilizer at half strength can be given monthly in spring/summer and if placed at room temperature in fall/winter every six to eight weeks.

peperomia rotundifolia likes it warm the year round and needs a winter minimum of approx. 15 °c/59 °f. at this temperature range, watering can be reduced, a fertilizer must not be given.

spraying it over with water from time to time increases humidity and keeps its leaves free from dust.

peperomia rotundifolia propagation

the creeping peperomia can easily be propagated with cuttings.

peperomia rubella – radiator plant

peperomia rubella is native to jamaica and can be grown in a hanging basket.

care

peperomia rubella does best on a bright position protected from afternoon sun. some morning and/or evening sun is ok. it can also be grown on a light shaded place.

a good regular potting mix can be used. it has to kept evenly moist but not wet. sitting in water may cause rotten roots. the drying of the soil’s surface between the waterings will be tolerated, but it shouldn’t dry completely.

in spring and summer a half diluted water soluble fertilizer can be given monthly and if placed at room temperature in fall/winter every six to eight weeks.

peperomia rubella likes room temperature throughout they year and needs a winter minimum of 15 °c/59 °f. at this temperature range watering can be reduced, a fertilizer must not be given.

a high humidity is welcome.

peperomia rubella

propagation

peperomia rubella can be propagated with cuttings.

scindapsus pictus – satin pothos, silk pothos

the genus scindapsus contains approx. 20 members, native to southeast asia. the climbing plants are suitable for growing in a hanging basket or training up a wall. from scindapsus pictus, known as satin pothos or silk pothos are different cultivars available.

care

the satin pothos does best on a bright to light shaded place without direct sunlight. some morning and/or evening sun will be tolerated. if placed to dark the leaves can loose their variegation.

scindapsus pictus can be planted in a good regular mix. keep it moist but not wet and avoid overwatering such as drying out. drying at the surface will be tolerated.

a half diluted water soluble fertilizer can be given monthly in spring/summer and every six to eight weeks during fall/winter. if placed colder at this time it needs less watering (but not drying out) and a fertilizer must not be given. there is also no need to feed for the first six to eight weeks if you have recently re-potted.

the satin photos likes room temperature throuhgout the year with a winter minimum of 15 °c (59 °f). it loves to be sprayed over with water from time to time.

scindapsus pictus silk pothos

propagation

scindapsus pictus can easily be propagated with cuttings.

spathiphyllum wallisii – peace lily, white sails

the peace lily (spathiphyllum wallisii), sometimes called white sails, is a easy to grow and nearly “unkaputtbar” (undestroyable) indoor houseplant like we say here in germany. there are cultivars available with variegated leaves.

care

in it’s natural habitat the peace lily is growing under trees. so it’s liked to be placed bright to shady, without direct sunlight. sun can bleach the leaves and turn them brown.

spraying with water from time to time makes the peace lily happy and keeps the leaves free of dust. after the flowers have died out, they can be taken away. the peace lily starts blooming again in approx. four to twelfe months.

the soil, a standart potting mix can be used, should kept constantly moist but neither wet nor dry.

at room temperatur a water soluble fertilizer can be given monthly during spring and summer, and every six to eight weeks in fall and winter. in half of by the manufacturer indicated concentration.

the peace lily likes room temperatur througout the year but is tolerating a short time of approx. 10 °c (50 °f) in winter time.

white sails spathiphyllum wallisii

propagation

spathiphyllum wallisii can be propagated by division. new crowns, formed at the plants side can be cutted and re-potted.

stromanthe sanguinea – stromanthe

the genus stromanthe belongs to the marantaceae family and contains about 13 members which are originally located in south and middle america. from stromanthe sanguinea are some cultivars available, very popular is “triostar”.

like the other members of the marantaceae family, stromanthe sanguinea is folding up the leaves in the night. if they are staying during the day this can indicate that it’s placed too to sunny or needs some watering.

care

stromanthe sanguinea can be placed from bright to half shady without direct sunlight. some morning and/or evening sun will be tolerated. if the colored cultivars are placed to dark they probably will show more greenish leaves.

a good regular potting mix can be used. keep it constantly moist but avoid overwatering such as drying out. wet legs can cause root rot.

a half diluted water soluble fertilizer can be given monthly in spring/summer and every six to eight weeks during fall/winter. there is no need to feed for the first six to eight weeks if you have recently re-potted.

the stromanthe likes it warm and should not be placed under 15 °c (59 °f) for a longer time. spraying it over with water can increase humidity and keeps its leaves free from dust.

stromanthe sanguinea
stromanthe sanguinea “horticolor”

propagation

propagation can be done by division, for example when the stromanthe needs to be re-potted.

Succulents

succulent plant identification

Here is a small list, sorted by scientific names, which maybe help You identifying cacti and succulents. More succulent plants and other species can be found at my plant identification project.


adromischus cooperi

aeonium arboreum
aeonium arboreum

jewelled aloe distans
aloe distans


aloe juvenna

carruanthus caninus
carruanthus caninus


ceropegia woodii


conophytum auriflorum × velutinum

conophytum bilobum
conophytum bilobum


cotyledon papillaris


crassula arborescens


crassula cv “baby necklace”


crassula falcata


crassula mesembryanthemopsis


crassula “morgan’s beauty”


crassula “springtime”


echeveria sp.


echeveria sp.


faucaria tuberculosa


faucaria tigrina


frithia pulchra


glottiphyllum herrei


gasteria carinata


haworthia attenuata


haworthia cymbiformis


haworthia magnifica


hoodia or huernia?


ledebouria socialis


lithops bromfieldii

lithops karasmontana
lithops karasmontana


pachyphytum compactum


pachyphytum oviferum

pachypodium densiflorum
pachypodium densiflorum

pachypodium lamerei
pachypodium lamerei (madagascar palm)

pachypodium namaquanum
pachypodium namaquanum

peperomia asperula
peperomia asperula

peperomia columella
peperomia columella


pleiospilos nelii


pleiospilos peersii

prepodesma orpenii
prepodesma orpenii


sansevieria cylindrica


sedum burrito


sedum nussbaumerianum

sinocrassula yunnanensis
sinocrassula yunnanensis

zamioculcas zamiifolia
zamioculcas zamiifolia

syngonium podophyllum – arrowhead vine, goosefoot plant

syngonium podophyllum is known as arrowhead vine, arrowhead plant or sometimes goosefoot plant. the popular houseplant is native to central and south america. there are some variegated cultivars available.

care

the arrowhead vine does best on a bright but not sunny place. it will tolerate some shade but then grows a bit slower. if placed to dark it produces smaller leaves.

it can be potted in a good regular mix. keep it constantly moist but not wet and avoid overwatering such as a complete dry out.

a half diluted water soluble fertilizer can be given monthly in spring/summer and every six to eight weeks during fall/winter. if recently re-potted or bought there is no need to feed it for the first eight weeks.

the arrowhead vine can be cultivated at room temperature throughout the year with a minum of 15 °c (59 °f) during winter time.

propagation

the arrowhead vine can easily propagated by cuttings.

tradescantia zebrina – wandering jew, inch plant

the native to mexico tradescantia zebrina is commonly known as wandering jew or inch plant. the easy to care for houseplant is available in different cultivars, with white, cream or purple variegated leaves. it’s suitable for hanging pots.

care

tradescantia zebrina does best if located bright but protected from afternoon sun during summer. some morning and/or evening sun is fine.

it can be grown in a standard potting mix which has to be kept evenly moist but not wet. sitting in water can cause rot. the drying of the soil’s surface is ok. if the leaves start to loose color it’s time to water.

a half diluted water soluble fertilizer can be given monthly in spring and summer and every six to eight weeks in fall and winter (if placed at room temperature).

tradescantia zebrina can be grown at room temperature throughout the year but also can be placed between 15-18 °c/59-64 °f in wintertime. at this temperature range it needs to be less watered, a fertilizer must not be given. but even now, the soil shouldn’t dry completely.

tradescantia zebrina

propagation

propagation of tradescantia zebrina is easy and can be done with cuttings.

vriesea carinata – lobster claw

vriesea carinata is commonly known as lobster claw or painted feather. this bromeliad has branching flower spikes. there are a lot of varieties available, in a range of colours from yellow to orange, red, violett or pink.

care

the lobster claw (vriesea carinata) is suitable for bright to light shaded places with some morning and/or evening sun.

there are special mixes for bromeliads available. but it can also be grown in a mix of regular potting soil and orchid bark (1:1) or in pure orchid soil.

keep it constantly moist but not wet, the drying of the soil’s surface will be tolerated, but it shouldn’t d dry completely. sitting in water can cause rotten roots. its reservoir should always contain some water.

in spring and summer a half diluted water soluble fertilizer can be given monthly and every six to eight weeks in fall and winter.

vriesea carinata welcomes a high humidity and likes to be sprayed over with water regularly. it needs room temperature throughout the year with a winter minimum of 15 °c/59 °f.

propagation

after flowering the lobster claw produces a new pup. if it has reached approx. 2/3 of the mother plants height it can be cutted of.

vriesea splendens – flaming sword

vriesea splendens’ common name flaming sword is based on its sword shaped inflorescence with closely overlapping bright red bracts. the popular houseplant is also known as zebra bromeliad or painted feather. its native to south america where its growing epiphytic (sitting on trees).

care

the flaming sword (vriesea splendens) can be placed from bright with some morning and/or evening sun to light shaded.

it can be grown in a mix of regular potting soil and orchid bark (1:1) or in pure orchid soil. there are also special mixes for bromeliads available.

keep it constantly moist but not wet, the drying of the soil’s surface will be tolerated, but it don’t let it dry completely. sitting in water can cause rotten roots. its reservoir should always be filled with some water.

in spring and summer a half diluted water soluble fertilizer can be given monthly and every six to eight weeks in fall and winter.

vriesea splendens welcomes a high humidity and likes to be sprayed over with water regularly. it should be grown at room temperature the year round with a winter minimum of 15 °c/59 °f.

propagation

after flowering the flaming sword produces a new pup. if this has reached approx. 2/3 of the mother plants height it can be cutted of.